Parents & Teens

Work Permits

“Work Permits” and/or “Working Papers” are not required in Florida and are not issued by either schools or a governmental agency in Florida. Unfortunately, many popular teen employers use applications with the request “If you are under 18, can you supply a Work Permit?” These applications are being used for businesses that have operations in other states that do require Work Permits. The question is not applicable in Florida.

Hour Limitations

Minors are limited in the hours they may work to permit them to attend and complete their educational responsibilities. Access for a summary of the work hour limitations for minors. Child Labor Hour Limitations

Exemptions

Minors are exempt from the hour limitations of the Child Labor Law if they have been married, graduated from an accredited high school or hold a high school equivalency diploma, served in the military, have been authorized by a court order, or been issued a partial waiver by the public school or the Child Labor Program.

Breaks

Minors may work no more than 4 consecutive hours without a 30 minute uninterrupted break.

Teen Jobs and Training

This site does not provide employment and training information. Please visit the Agency for Workforce Innovation site and their listing of One-Stop Centers providing employment and training services in your community.
The “Youth 2 Work” site offers tips on preparing for a job, locating a job and interviewing. You may also find information on youth careers, industry, safety and rules.

Tips for Parents

• Take an active role in the employment decisions of your teens. • Discuss the types of work involved, as well as the training and supervision provided by the employer. • Become knowledgeable about child labor laws.

Tips for Teens

• Know your rights to a safe and healthful workplace. • Learn to recognize hazards at work and speak up when you see them. • Participate in training programs at work or request training if none is offered. • Use safe work practices. • Learn where you can get information about child labor laws, health and safety, and your rights.

Prohibited Occupations

View Prohibited Occupations to see the types of occupations that are not permitted for youth.

Safety Information

Each year in the United States, about 70 teens die from work injuries and 70,000 get hurt badly enough that they go to a hospital emergency room.  View Safety Information to learn ways to reduce work place injuries and illnesses among youth.

Waivers of the Law

The Florida Child Labor Law is designed to serve and protect minors and to encourage them to remain in school. At times, however, some minors feel that the law conflicts with their best interest or that their life circumstances are such that they need to work. Minors have the right to request that the Child Labor Office exempt them from parts of the Child Labor Law. Minors not working in the entertainment industry, may apply for waivers through two methods, as described below. For a copy of the Partial Waiver Application and instructions, go to the top of the page and key on “APPLY FOR A LICENSE”, double-click the “Check here to” box. This will take you to the Application Center and the Child Labor applications.

STUDENTS ENROLLED IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS (K-12):

When minors are enrolled in the public high school system (K-12), either the minor’s public school superintendent or his/her designee has responsibility for issuing partial waivers. Schools can waive the Florida Child Labor Laws only when it is in the best interest of the child, however schools cannot waive federal law. Quite often the responsibility of issuing waivers is delegated to either the school counselor or a teacher who assists students with work site learning programs. These are good contacts to find out about obtaining a waiver.

ALL OTHER MINORS:

Minors not enrolled in (K-12) public schools, dropouts, students who are home schooled, in private school, enrolled in an alternative education program (GED), or have been expelled may apply for a partial waiver from the Child Labor Program. Partial waivers are approved on a case by case basis when in the best interest of the minor. At the end of this section, you can download a partial waiver application form. Minors must meet certain criteria to be considered for a partial waiver. The following supporting documentation must be submitted, based on the reason they are applying for the waiver: COURT ORDER: Documentation includes a copy of the court order that states that the minor must work and/or pay restitution. If working full time is a condition of probation and not written in a court order, a letter on letterhead from the parole officer must be submitted. FINANCIAL HARDSHIP: This requires that a notarized letter written by an adult family member or adult friend explaining the financial hardship or proof of current receipt of public assistance must be submitted. A minor must also submit a withdrawal from school which may be a letter, school withdrawal form, or a computer printout confirming the minor’s name, withdrawal code, and withdrawal date. OTHER HARDSHIP: The supporting documentation must include a letter on letterhead from a doctor, pastor, school counselor, or other professional familiar with the minor’s hardship, or a notarized statement from an adult explaining the circumstances or situation. This category is defined as a life circumstance other than a financial or medical hardship that would place a hardship on the minor if a waiver was not granted. The minor must also submit a withdrawal from school which may be a letter, school withdrawal form, or a computer printout confirming the minor’s name, withdrawal code, and withdrawal date. SCHOOL STATUS: This category refers to minors not in the public school system. The supporting documentation is as follows: • Private School requires a letter on school letterhead which states that the minor is enrolled and attending school, and that working additional hours will not jeopardize school progress. • Home School must include a withdrawal from school which may be a letter, school withdrawal form, computer printout showing name, withdrawal code, and withdrawal date, or an acknowledgement from the school system acknowledging your intent to establish a home school program. Additionally, the documentation must contain a notarized statement from the parent or guardian as to the days and hours the minor receives home school instruction. • Adult Education or GED Prep Classes waiver requests require a withdrawal from school which may be a letter on school letterhead, a school withdrawal form, or computer printout showing name, withdrawal code and withdrawal date. An authorization from the public school system permitting the minor to obtain education through alternative means is also acceptable. The minor must also submit a letter on letterhead from the adult education school that states the minor is enrolled, attending, and the hours of attendance. (Example: Monday through Friday, 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.) • Expulsion requirements for minors who are expelled from school include a copy of the expulsion letter from the school. The waiver will be for no more than the period of the expulsion, or one year, whichever occurs first. MEDICAL HARDSHIP: Supporting documents include a letter on letterhead from a doctor, pastor, school counselor, or other professional familiar with the minor’s medical hardship, or a notarized statement from an adult explaining the circumstances or situation. A minor must also submit a withdrawal from school, which may be a letter, school withdrawal form, or a computer printout showing the minor’s name, withdrawal code and withdrawal date.

All applications must be accompanied by proof of age such as a copy of a birth certificate, driver license, age certificate, Florida Identification or passport.

PLEASE DO NOT SEND ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS. Suggestions for completing FCL-1002: • Minors who have dropped out of school, must qualify based on a financial, medical or other hardship waiver. • The completed FCL-1002 and supporting documentation may be faxed to the Child Labor Program.

Need Help?

All requests for publications, documents, forms, applications for licenses, permits and other similar certifications can be obtained by contacting the Child Labor Division. Business Hours are 8:00 am – 5:00 pm, Monday thru Friday.

Jerry Wilson, Director
Division of Regulation

Sophia Terrelonge, Program Manager
Child Labor Program
2601 Blair Stone Road
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0783

Telephone: 850.488.3131
Toll-Free Line: 800.226.2536
Facsimile: 850.487.4928
Email: ChildLabor.Entertainment@myfloridalicense.com Email: ChildLaborWaivers@myfloridalicense.com