Construction Industry FAQs

What are the functions of the Construction Industry Licensing Board?

The Construction Industry Licensing Board regulates construction contractors and their businesses.

What are the statutes and rules that govern the licensing of Construction Contractors?

Chapter 489, Part I, of the Florida Statutes and Chapter 61G4 of the Florida Administrative Code.

Where can I obtain copies of the laws and rules that govern the construction industry?

The laws and rules can be obtained from the Board’s website, Statutes and Rules. If you need further assistance, you may call the Customer Contact Center at 850.487.1395.

When and where is the next board meeting?

The dates and locations are available on the main page, Board Meeting Information.

Where can I obtain a copy of the board meeting agenda or past minutes?

Agendas and minutes are available on the main page, Board Meeting Information.

There are two types of licensure - registration and certification. How do I determine which license I need?

If you obtain a local, county or city contracting license, you must apply for initial state registration. You may only practice contracting in that county or city, along with any adjoining locales that will accept your registration. If you complete the Florida contractor’s examination and apply for initial certification, your licensure will allow you to work throughout the state. You 2017 July may access both licensure applications and the Florida contractor’s examination application online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

What contractor categories require state registration or certification?

The following categories require registration or certification: general; building; residential; sheet metal; roofing; air-conditioning; mechanical; swimming pool/spa; plumbing; underground utility and excavation; solar and pollutant storage.

What types of work can I do with each license?

You can obtain a description of each licensure category online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

Your website lists some additional licensure categories that are not mentioned in Question 2. Why?

The additional licensure categories are “specialty” licenses. They are voluntary, statewide licenses that you may obtain instead of acquiring a local specialty license. They include: specialty structure (e.g., aluminum enclosures, door and window installation); gypsum drywall; swimming pool specialties; marine; glass and glazing; tower; building demolition; irrigation and industrial facilities.

Aren’t there certain swimming pool specialty licenses that were created by the board?

Yes, they include: swimming pool layout, structural, excavation, trim, decking, piping, and finishes categories. Applicants must be at least 18 years of age and of good moral character. The applicant must successfully complete a written or practical examination. A swimming pool contractor who wishes to serve as a practical examiner must register with the Department of Business and Professional Regulation and must complete a board-approved examiner course.

I don’t see the work I do under any of the board’s licensure categories. What do I do?

Check your county or city to find out if it offers a local specialty license for the type of work you perform. If it does, you will not have to obtain a state license. However, if your county or city does not offer such a license, and the work you perform creates or modifies a structure, you will most likely require a state residential, building or general contractor’s license.

What types of work do not require a state license?

Cabinets, countertops, paint, wallpaper, carpet, tile and window treatments are examples of work that do not require state licensure.

What are the requirements to become licensed as a registered contractor?

You must provide a copy of your local contractor’s license. You may access the application for an initial registered contractor’s license online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

What are the requirements to become licensed as a certified contractor?

You must complete the Florida contractor’s examination, meet financial stability and responsibility requirements and provide proof of experience for the category in which you wish to become licensed. You may access the application for an initial certified contractor’s license and the Florida contractor’s examination application online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

What experience do I need to become a certified contractor?

You need four years of field experience in the category of licensure you wish to obtain. One of those four years must be supervisory experience. You can also substitute up to three years of military service or up to three years of college credit hours in place of the required field experience.

Does my military service or college education have to be construction-related?

No, any type of military service will count toward the three years of field experience. Military service time is established by submitting a copy of your military form DD214. Likewise, any accredited college credit hours may be applied. In addition to military or education, a minimum of one year of supervisory construction experience within the licensed category is required.

Does my college education have to be construction-related?

No, any accredited college credit hours may be applied.

Do I have to demonstrate any special experience for a building or general contractor’s license?

Yes. You have to demonstrate experience in four of the following seven categories:

  • Foundations/Slabs in excess of 20,000 square feet
  • Masonry walls
  • Steel erection
  • Elevated slabs
  • Pre-cast concrete structures
  • Column erection
  • Formwork for structural reinforced concrete
  • General Contractors; at least one year of such experience was in construction of structures not less than four (4) stories in height
Can I upgrade my license to a higher category?

In certain cases, you can upgrade your license. They include the following:

  • An active certified Class C air-conditioning contractor is eligible to take the Class B examination after three years of active certification.
  • An active certified Class C air-conditioning contractor is eligible to take the Class A examination after four years of active certification.
  • An active certified Class B air-conditioning contractor is eligible to take the Class A examination after one year of active certification.
  • An active certified pool/spa servicing contractor is eligible to take the residential pool examination after three years of active certification.
  • An active certified pool/spa servicing contractor is eligible to take the commercial pool examination after four years of active certification.
  • An active certified residential pool contractor is eligible to take the commercial pool examination after one year of active certification.

To upgrade your license, you must pass the appropriate state certification examination and submit an application for initial licensure in the new category.

How often are examinations given?

General, Building and Residential contractors must pass an examination which consists of three parts: Project Management, Contract Administration, and Business/Finance. Applicants for Building Demolition Specialty, Tower Specialty and Industrial Facilities Specialty licenses must take and pass the General contractor examination. All other categories must pass an examination which consists of two parts: General (or “Trade”) Knowledge and Business/Finance.

The Business/Finance examination is computer-based and is administered by the Department’s vendor, Pearson VUE. You can access additional information regarding scheduling the Business/Finance examination on the Construction Examinations Information page.

The General (or “Trade”) Knowledge, Project Management and Contract Administration examinations for the following categories are given by the Department six times per year, in February, April, June, August, October and December: General, Building, Residential, Mechanical, Class-A Air Conditioning, Class-B Air Conditioning and Plumbing.

The General (or “Trade”) Knowledge computer-based examinations for the following categories are available at any time: Commercial Pool/Spa, Drywall Specialty, Gas Line Specialty, Glass & Glazing Specialty, Irrigation Specialty, Marine Specialty, Pollutant Storage Systems, Pool/Spa Specialty, Residential Pool/Spa, Roofing, Sheet Metal, Solar, Specialty Structure and Underground Utility and Excavation.

The dates and locations of the examinations are available on the Construction Examinations Information page.

Am I exempt from taking the Business/Finance examination if I am already licensed and am attempting to obtain licensure in another category?

Yes, licensees with a Current/Active status license issued by the CILB are exempt from the Business/Finance portion of the examination required for licensure in the new category.

Where are examinations given?

Paper-and-pencil General (or “Trade”) Knowledge, Project Management and Contract Administration examinations are administered by the Department in Tallahassee, Orlando, and Miami. The dates and locations are available online on the Examination Information page. The Business/Finance and all computer-based examinations are administered by the Department’s vendor, Pearson VUE, at various examination sites throughout the state. To assist you in selecting a convenient location, Pearson VUE publishes a list of locations online, at http://www.pearsonvue.com.

How long is the examination?

The General (or “trade”) Knowledge, Project Management and Contract Administration exams are administered in the same day. The Business/Finance examination is six and one-half hours.

What type of examination is given?

The examination is open-book. You can access examination information and a detailed list of references, what books are needed and which day of the exam for each category or specialty, as well as schools and bookstores, on the Construction Examinations Information page.

If I fail one or more portions of the examination, do I have to retake all parts?

No. Rule 61G4-16.009, Florida Administrative Code, states, “A candidate shall be required to retake only the tests on which he or she failed to achieve a passing score or failed to appear to take when scheduled.”

If I have to re-take a portion of the examination, how long do I have to re-take and pass the other portions?

You must complete all portions of the examination within 4 years of the first attempt. After four years, all previous test scores become invalid and you will be required to take all parts of the examination again.

How long after I pass the examinations do I have to apply for Initial Licensure?

You must apply within four years. After four years you must apply to take the examination again.

Do I need a Certificate of Authority?

A Certificate of Authority is also known as a “Qualified Business License.” These licenses are not required as of October 1, 2009. However, if you intend to do business as a corporation, partnership, limited liability company, any business entity other than a sole proprietorship or when you operate as an individual, you must apply to be the “qualifying agent” of the business. The business name will appear on your license.

Are contractors required to qualify a construction business?

Yes, contractors are required to qualify a construction business with their individual license.

Are contractors required to provide the background information to qualify a business?

Yes, contractors are required to provide the criminal history information to qualify a construction company.

Will the name of the construction business be listed on the contractor’s license?

Yes, the name of the qualified business will be listed on the contractor’s license.

Do I need insurance?

Active licensees must maintain minimum amounts of insurance at all times. General and building contractors must maintain $300,000 liability insurance and $50,000 property damage insurance. All other categories must maintain $100,000 liability and $25,000 property damage insurance, or in amounts as defined by board rule.

Do I need workers’ compensation coverage?

Active licensees must maintain workers’ compensation coverage or an exemption. If you are going to obtain an exemption, you can still apply for licensure, as long as you indicate that you will obtain the exemption within 30 days of becoming licensed.

Do I need to demonstrate minimum net worth?

No, but you must submit a credit report showing a FICO credit score of 660 or higher.

Do I need a Financially Responsible Officer (FRO) application?

If your company designates a financially responsible officer to take financial responsibility for the company, that individual must complete the FRO application. You may access the FRO application online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

Do I need a bond?

If an applicant has a FICO credit score lower than 660, he or she will be requested to provide a licensing bond or letter of credit to obtain licensure. Please review the Department’s Financial Responsibility and Stability website for additional information on the Board’s requirements. The amount of the licensing bond or letter of credit is based on the type of license requested: $20,000 for Division I contractors and $10,000 for Division II contractors. Please visit the Department’s Financial Responsibility and Stability website for additional information on the Board’s financial requirements.

Does my Financially Responsible Officer need a bond?

Yes, all Financially Responsible Officers must have a bond in place to insure financial obligations that may result from construction work. The bond must be payable to the Construction Industry Licensing Board. Bonds must be in the amount of $100,000.

Is a letter of bondability acceptable in lieu of a surety bond or licensing bond?

No, a letter of bondability is not acceptable in lieu of a surety or licensing bond.

Is anything acceptable in lieu of a surety bond?

Yes, an irrevocable letter of credit in the same amount as the required bond is acceptable in lieu of a surety or licensing bond.

Can a person be the Financially Responsible Officer (FRO) for more than one construction business?

Yes, a person can be a Financially Responsible Officer for more than one construction business. They will be required to complete the FRO application and obtain a bond for each business.

How do I switch from one Financially Responsible Officer (FRO) to another?

The current FRO must submit a letter explaining that they are resigning from the position. The new FRO will need to complete and submit a new FRO application. In some cases, you may need to amend the bond or letter of credit that your FRO holds. Contact your bonding or banking agent for additional information.

How many contractors can qualify a business?

There is no limit.

Does a contractor have to own the business he or she is applying to qualify?

No, however, the contractor must have supervisory authority and must have final approval authority for all of the construction affairs of the business. If the contractor lacks financial responsibility for the company, the company must obtain a Financially Responsible Officer.

Do the Florida Statutes provide for endorsement of out-of-state licenses?

Yes. You must demonstrate successful completion of a licensing examination that is substantially equivalent to the Florida examination or you must demonstrate that you have an out-of-state license, and that the licensure requirements were substantially equivalent to Florida’s current requirements. Please note that endorsement application requirements are very stringent and rarely get approved by the Construction Industry Licensing Board.

Is endorsement guaranteed?

No. Endorsement is subject to approval by the Construction Industry Licensing Board. If the board denies your application, your fee is nonrefundable. Please note that endorsement application requirements are very stringent and rarely get approved by the Construction Industry Licensing Board.

Can I qualify more than one business?

Yes. You may qualify two or more businesses. You may access the application to qualify an additional business entity online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

What are the requirements for a contractor to qualify more than one business?

In order to qualify an additional business entity, you must present evidence to the Construction Industry Licensing Board of supervisory ability for each business. If you do not own more than 50% of the proposed business(es) and the proposed business, you will be required to appear at one of the board’s monthly meetings.

Are Credit Reports required?

Credit reports are required for the qualifying agent and for both businesses. Credit reports must include a FICO credit score and indicate that public records were checked on local, state and federal levels. Please visit the Department’s Financial Responsibility and Stability website for additional information on the Board’s financial requirements.

If I am the qualifying agent for a business, can I also contract in my own name?

No, to contract as an individual, you would have to apply to qualify an additional business entity.

If I obtain a second license in a different contracting category (for example, I am a general contractor and I wish to obtain a roofing license), can I operate that license under a different business?

Yes, but you would have to apply to qualify an additional business entity prior to operating in the new business name.

If I no longer wish to qualify a business, can I send the board a letter requesting removal from the company?

No, you must file an application to inactivate the license, or file the application for a change of status from one business entity to another or a change of status from qualifying business to individual status. You may access these applications online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

Can I qualify a joint venture with my existing license?

No, you would have to apply to qualify the joint venture just like you would any other business.

Can my company form a joint venture with an unlicensed company?

Yes. You would have to apply to qualify the joint venture just like you would any other business.

Can the joint venture bid a project prior to my becoming approved as a qualifying agent?

Yes, but the joint venture must obtain approval of the Construction Industry Licensing Board’s Executive Director prior to submitting the bid on a construction project. The joint venture must provide the Executive Director a copy of the written joint venture agreement and a statement of authority signed by an officer of each company giving the proposed qualifying agent full authority to conduct the contracting business of the joint venture.

If I am licensed in another state, may I come to Florida to build a single project?

You may obtain a limited, nonrenewable registration for a single project. The registration is good for one year. You must appear before the Construction Industry Licensing Board for approval and must be able to demonstrate that the proposed project requires special skills that cannot be obtained by using a Florida licensee. Please note that limited non-renewable registration application requirements are strictly construed and are rarely approved by the Construction Industry Licensing Board.

What happens if my qualifying agent dies?

If your qualifying agent dies, you must notify the Construction Industry Licensing Board office within 30 days, if not immediately. You can request a temporary, nonrenewable license that will allow you to continue any jobs contracted prior to the qualifying agent’s death, regardless of whether a permit had already been obtained.

What happens if my qualifying agent resigns or I have to fire him?

When a qualifying agent resigns or is fired, the company must obtain another qualifying agent within 60 days. The company can request a temporary, nonrenewable license that will allow it to continue working for up to 60 days to complete any existing contracts.

How do I obtain a temporary, nonrenewable license?

You must send a request in writing to the Executive Director of the Construction Industry Licensing Board, 2601 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-1039.

Do I have to have any qualifications to request a temporary, nonrenewable license?

If the qualifying agent dies, you have to demonstrate that you have personal knowledge of the projects, along with the ability to complete them. If the qualifying agent resigns or is fired, you must indicate that you are an officer or partner of the company, and must state that you will assume all the responsibility of a primary qualifying agent.

Is there an expiration date on the temporary, nonrenewable license?

If the qualifying agent dies, the temporary, nonrenewable license is good until all projects are finished. If the qualifying agent resigns or is fired, the temporary, nonrenewable license is good for 60 days and cannot be extended.

If I resign from a company or I am fired, what do I do to continue contracting?

You must file a change of status application. You may access the application online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

What is probation?

Applicants for initial licensure may be placed on a probationary status if the board has concerns about the applicant’s criminal history, good moral character, financial stability, or for any other reason deemed appropriate by the board. Additionally, licensees may be placed on probation status due to a disciplinary case.

Probationary licensees are required to appear before the board at least twice annually until the expiration of the probationary status. In connection with each probation appearance, the licensee shall answer questions under oath and shall provide copies of all construction related monthly bank statements, permit applications, contracts, and operations questionnaires.

Does a probationary status limit the work that the contractor can perform?

No. As long as the licensee is complying with the conditions of probation, there are no restrictions placed on the probationary license.

How can I obtain assistance on completing my application?

If you have any questions or need assistance completing your application, please contact the department’s Customer Contact Center at 850.487.1395.

Where do I mail my application?

Department of Business and Professional Regulation
Bureau of Central Intake and Licensure
2601 Blair Stone Road
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0783

What are the fees for Construction applications?
  • Certified Contractor’s Examination – $135.00
  • Financially Responsible Officer – $200.00
  • Limited Non-renewable Registration – $309.00
  • Initial Licensure for Certified Contractor – If you passed all parts of your examination prior to January 1, 2009, the following fees apply: $409.00 if you are applying for initial licensure between May 1 of an even year and August 31 of an odd year. The fee is prorated to $309.00 if you are applying for initial licensure between September 1 of an odd year and April 30 of an even year. If you apply to qualify a business, you will pay an additional Business Registration fee of $50.
  • Initial Licensure for Certified Contractor – If you passed any part of your examination after January 1, 2009, the following fees apply: $249.00 if you are applying for initial licensure between May 1 of an even year and August 31 of an odd year. The fee is prorated to $149.00 if you are applying for initial licensure between September 1 of an odd year and April 30 of an even year. If you apply to qualify a business, you will pay an additional Business Registration fee of $50.
  • Initial Licensure for Registered Contractor – $309.00 if you are applying for initial licensure between May 1 of an odd year and August 31 of an even year. The fee is prorated to $209.00 if you are applying for initial licensure between September 1 of an even year and April 30 of an odd year. If you apply to qualify a business, you will pay an additional Business Registration fee of $50.
  • Contractor to change from one business entity to another – $50.00 for the contractor.
  • Contractor to change status from individual to qualifying business – $50.00 for the contractor.
  • Contractor to change status from qualifying a business to individual status – $50.00
  • Certified Contractor to qualify an additional business entity – $209.00 if you are applying for initial licensure between May 1 of an even year and August 31 of an odd year. The fee is prorated to $109.00 if you are applying for initial licensure between September 1 of an odd year and April 30 of an even year.
  • Registered Contractor to qualify an additional business organization – $309.00 if you are applying for initial licensure between May 1 of an odd year and August 31 of an even year. The fee is prorated to $209.00 if you are applying for initial licensure between September 1 of an even year and April 30 of an odd year.
Do all applications require review by the board?

No. Most additional business applications and many initial licensure and change of status applications will require review by the board. Notice is mailed approximately 14 days prior to the meeting in which the application will be reviewed.

I just received notice that my application is going to be reviewed by the board. Do I have to be present at the meeting?

Maybe! If you are applying to qualify an additional business entity and your application has been forwarded to the board for review, you must be present at the time your application is reviewed pursuant to rule 61G4-15.0021(5), F.A.C. If you are application is not for qualification of an additional business entity then your presence is not required.

Please note that while your presence may not be required under all circumstances, it may be to your benefit to attend the scheduled hearing to address any questions or concerns that the board may have regarding your application.

If my application is approved, how long will it take to receive my license?

Licenses are typically issued within two weeks after the conclusion of the board meeting in which the application was approved.

What happens if the board denies my application?

Within 60 days after the conclusion of the board meeting, the department will mail a notice of intent to deny which explains the reason(s) for denial. The notice includes the information needed in order to file an appeal or request a hearing, should the applicant choose to do so. The notice fully explains all reasons for denial.

Do I have to renew an inactive license?

You must renew your inactive license every two years.

When do I renew my qualified business license?

As of October 1, 2009, qualified business licenses are no longer required. You are not required to renew or maintain the qualified business license.

What does current, active status mean?

Your contractor’s license is current and you may practice within your scope of work.

What does current, inactive status mean?

Your contractor’s license is current, but you are not actively practicing within the construction profession.

What does delinquent, active status mean?

Your contractor’s license was not renewed by the expiration date. The status of your license before the expiration date was active. You may not practice with this license until the status has been updated.

What does delinquent, inactive status mean?

Your contractor’s license was not renewed by the expiration date. The status of your license before the expiration date was inactive.

How do I reactivate my inactive license?

You must complete the Department’s reactivation application, submit the reactivation fee and provide proof of completing the continuing education requirements for the renewal cycle immediately preceding your license reactivation.

Can I reactivate my null and void license?

Generally, you must start the licensure process over. If you are certified, you must retake the state contractor’s examination. However, the Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) has discretion to reinstate the certification of a licensee who failed to renew as a result of illness or economic hardship. The Department has discretion on a case-by-case basis to determine illness and economic hardship. To apply, you must submit a reinstatement application. Applications can be found online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

When I reapply, will I be able to get my old license number back?

If your license is reinstated because of illness or hardship, you may keep the old license number. If the board does not reinstate your license and you reapply, you will receive a new license number, because the old license no longer exists.

What are the fees to renew my certified and registered contractor’s license?
  • Current, active (individual) – $209.00
  • Current, Active(qualifying business) – $259.00
  • Delinquent, active (individual) – $234.00
  • Delinquent, Active(qualifying business) – $284.00
  • Current, inactive – $59.00
  • Delinquent, inactive $143.00
When do I renew my license?

Certified contractors renew their licenses on August 31 of every even-numbered year. Registered contractors renew their licenses August 31 of every odd-numbered year.

What is the application fee for a contractor to reactivate outside of a renewal period?

The fee is $250.00.

What is the fee for a contractor to become inactive outside a renewal period?

The fee is $50.00. Please note that there is no fee required to become inactive during a renewal period.

What are the CE requirements for license renewal?

All contractors are required, as a part of the 14 hours of continuing education, to have at least one hour in each of the following areas of study: Workplace Safety, Workers’ Compensation, Business Practices, Advanced Module Building Code, and Laws and Rules. Additionally General, Building, Residential, Roofing, Specialty Structure, and Glass and Glazing Specialty contractors must complete one hour of Wind Mitigation Methodology as part of their required 14-hours. The remaining are classified as general credits.

Do I have to complete continuing education courses for each renewal cycle my license was inactive in order to reactivate my license?

No. In 2012, the Florida Legislature passed House Bill 517 to limit reactivation requirements for licensed contractors to no more than one renewal cycle of continuing education. Therefore, a contractor may reactivate his or her license by completing the continuing education requirements for the renewal cycle immediately preceding license reactivation.

Do I still need to take the Florida Building Code Core Course?

No. Sections 489.115 and 553.841 of the Florida Statutes were amended to by the Florida Legislature to remove the core course requirement in 2009.

I am changing my license status to inactive. Am I required to maintain my continuing education?

No. However, when you reactivate your license, you must show proof of completing 14 hours of continuing education for the renewal cycle immediately preceding reactivation of your license. Included in the 14 hours, you must show that you have complied with all requirements for your license type.

Can continuing education be completed online?

Yes. There are certain providers who are approved to teach online courses. A list of approved providers can be found online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/servop/testing/documents/ce_prov.pdf. Providers with the “C / I” or “I” designation are approved to offer online courses.

When did continuing education become a requirement?

The requirement became effective in the Florida Statutes in December 1993. For registered contractors, the first reporting cycle was 1993-1995. For certified contractors, the first reporting cycle was 1994-1996.

When did business practices become a requirement?

Business practices was added as a mandatory hour in 1998 affecting the 1998-2000 renewal cycle for certified contractors and the 1997-1999 renewal cycle for registered contractors.

When did the advanced building code module become a requirement?

It became a requirement in September 2005. It began during the 2004-2006 renewal cycle for certified contractors and the 2005-2007 renewal cycle for registered contractors.

When did Wind Mitigation Methodologies become a requirement?

It became a requirement in November 2007. It began during the 2006-2008 renewal cycle for certified contractors and the 2007-2009 renewal cycle for registered contractors.

When did Laws and Rules become a requirement?

It became a requirement in September 2007. It began during the 2006-2008 renewal cycle for certified contractors and the 2007-2009 renewal cycle for registered contractors. Originally the requirement was 3-hours however as of November 2007 it was changed to 1-hour.

How can I check on the number of hours of CE that I have completed?

Simply go to our online services page to log on or activate your account and verify your completed CE hours. The requirement for providers to report completion of courses was not established until September 1, 2001. Therefore, the only hours tracked are those completed since that date. Licensees should maintain their individual course completion certificates. Online accounts will only reflect hours for the current renewal cycle. Licensees will not be able to view past hours once a renewal cycle has ended and/or the license has been renewed.

Where can I get provider and course applications?

You can download the most current applications at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/. It is critical that you are using the most current versions of all applications you submit to the Department.

When does my continuing education providership expire?

Providerships expire May 31 of every odd year.

What is the cost of registering as a provider and for having a course approved?

The fee for registering and renewing a providership is $250.00. The fee for course approval and renewal is $25.00 per course hour, with a fee cap of $150.00 per course.

How long does it take to get my providership and/or course approved?

The Construction Industry Licensing Board must approve or deny an application within 90 days. That does not mean that it will take a full 90 days; however, delays in the process may be experienced if the application is incomplete. The board office makes every effort to send completed applications to the first board meeting scheduled after receipt of the application.

How often are Providership/Course applications reviewed by the Construction Industry Licensing Board for approval?

The board reviews applications during each of its monthly meetings. The Board does not meet in the month of December. Please have your applications prepared for either the November or January Board meetings.

When can I advertise my course?

You cannot advertise a course for continuing education credit until the Construction Industry Licensing Board has approved it.

Is there a time limit for electronically submitting course completion information?

Florida Statutes require continuing education providers to electronically submit licensee course completion information to the department no later than 30 calendar days after course completion or prior to the licensee’s renewal date, whichever occurs sooner.

I have a complaint about a contractor or a contracting business. Whom do I contact?

Please contact the department’s Customer Contact Center at 850.487.1395 or visit the Complaints webpage.

I have a complaint about an unlicensed contractor. Whom do I contact?

Please contact the department’s toll-free unlicensed activity complaint line at 1.866.532.1440 or visit the Complaints webpage.

ADVERTISING

When is a contractor required to display his or her license number?

Each registered or certified contractor must include his or her license number on any application for building permit; offer of service; business proposal; bid; contract; advertisement; sign; vehicle that displays the name of the contractor or qualified business; or vehicle that displays graphics or text that would lead a reasonable person to believe the vehicle is being used for construction purposes.

What does the term “advertise” include for license number purposes?

The term “advertise” applies to business cards, business proposals, contracts, construction site signs, newspaper ads, airwave transmissions, electronic media including Internet sites, phone directories and other media. Other media includes handbills, billboards, flyers, shopping and service guides (coupon offerings), magazines (including trade association publications), classified advertisements, manufacturer’s “authorized dealer” listings, and signs on vehicles. The term does not apply to balloons, pencils, pens, hats, shirts, and articles of clothing or other promotional novelties.

MILITARY EXEMPTION

Are there exemptions from renewal requirements for military personnel and spouses of military personnel?

Military personnel and spouses are exempt from licensure renewal provisions when they are absent from Florida because of their military duties. The licensee must provide a copy of the orders that require out-of-state service to the department’s Central Intake Unit, 2601 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0783. Once the orders have been received and approved for exemption, the license will be placed in an inactive status with no fees required. The license will remain on inactive status for up to two renewal cycles, at which time the licensee must re-submit current orders to update the exemption. If the exemption is not updated, or the license is not renewed prior to expiration, it will become delinquent. Fees and continuing education will not be required to reactivate the license.

LIENS

What do I do if a lien is filed on my property?

You may access this link to a brochure that addresses Florida’s Construction Lien Law. Please note that the Department of Business and Professional Regulation and the Construction Industry Licensing Board do not regulate the lien law. If you need additional information, please consult an attorney who is experienced in lien law.

How can I locate an attorney?

You may contact the Florida Bar at www.flabar.org.

EXEMPTIONS

Can an apartment community employee perform construction repairs?

The employees of 100 unit communities who hold an NAA apartment maintenance technician’s certificate are exempted from contractor licensing requirements when they are performing minor repairs to existing electric water heaters, electric heating, ventilation and air-conditioning systems when the repair costs do not exceed $1,000.00 and are not the functional equivalent of replacing the system.

What is the recovery fund?

The Florida Homeowners’ Construction Recovery Fund is a fund of last resort available to a natural person who has suffered monetary damages by the financial mismanagement or misconduct of a contractor, and who has exhausted all other resources of payment. The Construction Industry Licensing Board makes the determination of eligibility for an award.

For contracts entered into prior to July 1, 2016, the fund is restricted to contracts entered into with Division I contractors. A contract by a Division 2 contractor to install or repair a pool, plumbing, or roof for example will be eligible for reimbursement from the fund so long as it was executed after July 1, 2016.

How do I know if I am eligible for the fund?

In conjunction with the above answer, you may contact the Recovery Fund office by writing: Florida Homeowners’ Construction Recovery Fund, 2601 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee, FL 32399-2215 to request a claim application and information packet, or you may call the office at (850) 921-6593. You may review the Florida Statutes at www.flsenate.gov by reviewing sections 489.141 and 489.129, Florida Statutes.

Do you mean that even if I sued the contractor and have a judgment, I may not be able to be reimbursed from the recovery fund?

No matter the amount of the judgment or final order award, the order must find violations of at least one of those listed in the eligibility Statutes, section 489.129 g, j, or k. Please see below for a further explanation.

What are the violations that would make me eligible?

Florida Statutes section 489.129 identifies the following violations: A “g” violation is committing mismanagement or misconduct in the practice of contracting that causes financial harm to a customer. This occurs when there were valid liens filed that were not satisfied by the contractor; the contractor abandoned the job and the percentage of completion is less than the percentage paid; or the job was completed and the customer pays more than what was contracted for as a result of circumstances beyond the control of the contractor. A “j” violation is abandoning the job. Here the contractor has done nothing for 90 days, termination was without cause or notice to the owner, or the contractor failed to perform without cause. A “k” violation is for signing a statement falsely indicating that the work is bonded, or falsely stating that all subcontracted work, labor and materials has been paid for, or falsely stating that workers’ compensation or public liability insurance is provided.

Are there any other restrictions?

Yes. Section 489.141(2), Florida Statutes gives the exceptions to eligibility for making a claim against the Recovery Fund. In addition, the Recovery Fund can only compensate you for actual damages directly caused by the contractor’s g, j, or k, violations.

I have a civil judgment in which a violation of the above statutes was committed; when do I get my check?

Having a civil court judgment, a criminal court award or a final order of discipline based on 489.129, g, j, or k, awarding financial restitution is just the first step in the process. Once you have a judgment, you must attempt to discover assets of the judgment debtor and execute on that judgment. Once those steps are taken you may be eligible for making a claim with the recovery fund.

I have a judgment awarding me $78,000 in damages. Can I get all my money back from the fund?

The fund awards the lesser amount of your judgment/restitution order, the statutory cap, and the actual damages. The statutory cap for a Division 1 contractor is $50,000. The statutory cap for a Division 2 contractor is $15,000. Actual damages are computed based on the verified amount to complete the terms of the original contract and pay off all liens, minus the price of the original contract. However, where no work was performed actual damages are the amount of the deposit paid to the original contractor.

What happens if other claims were made against the same contractor, or when the Fund has awarded many claims in a given year?

Each contractor has an aggregate lifetime cap. The total claims against a Division 1 contractor are capped at $500,000. Total claims against a Division 2 contractor are capped at $150,000. Claims are heard in the order they are completed, unless the claimant requests a continuance. Each year, the legislature appropriates a certain total amount for payment of claims. Should the total awards by the fund reach the total yearly appropriated amount, claims will be carried forward to the next year fiscal year, beginning on July 1.

How do I do an asset search?

When you request your application packet you will be given a document that will help prepare an asset search. We provide a sample outline of an affidavit that may be used. You must do the actual search.

This sample is also online at:
http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/pro/cilb/documents/fhcrf_affidavit_of_asset_search.pdf

For instruction on how to perform the asset search, please see:
http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/pro/cilb/documents/fhcrf_how_to_do_asset_search.pdf

The contractor filed Bankruptcy, what will I need to say on the Asset Search Affidavit?

All claimants filing for the Florida Homeowners’ Construction Recovery Fund are required to complete an Affidavit of Diligent Asset search per Florida Administrative Code Definition [61G4 – 21.002(1)]: “All reasonable searches and inquiries,” as provided in Section 489.141(1), F.S., shall mean that exhaustive efforts have been made to determine whether the contractor possesses any property or assets with which to satisfy the underlying judgment, order of restitution, or award in arbitration, in whole or in part, and that no such property or assets have been identified or located. Furthermore, a claimant shall not be excused from making all reasonable searches and inquiries because the contractor filed for protection under the bankruptcy code.

Help! The contractor filed bankruptcy and the Civil Court won’t let me continue, or begin, my lawsuit. What should I do?

If the contractor filed bankruptcy, this does not stop you from pursuing a civil judgment. The suit can be pursued in civil court with permission of the bankruptcy court, or it can be pursued through the bankruptcy court. However, if you have been precluded from obtaining a judgment from the contractor, you may obtain a “Motion to Preclude” from the bankruptcy court pursuant to Section 489.141 (1)(a) 2. You should ask your attorney for more information on how to take either action.

How long will it take for my claim application to be processed?

This is a difficult question to answer. The time element depends on how much information you have provided. Claims can vary greatly in complexity and some claimants are able to obtain documentation more quickly than others. The scheduling of your claim for Board hearing is determined by whether all of the required documents are submitted and whether there is corroborating or supporting documentation needed. If the claim is missing required documentation we will notify you via letter and it is in your best interest to provide the requested documentation as quickly as possible. Additional information is reviewed in order of the date received and claims are listed as complete based on the date received of the final documentation which completed the claim. Claims cannot be presented to the Board without all of the required documents, unless the case is presented for administrative closure.

May I come to the hearing and speak?

Yes. Although it is not mandatory, you are encouraged to be present in the event that Recovery Fund Committee members have questions you might be able to answer. You and the contractor will be sent a letter notice at least 14 days prior to the hearing; therefore it is important you keep the Recovery Fund informed of your current contact information. Any new information that you send after that notice or hand carry to the Board meeting will be cause for the Committee to continue the hearing to a subsequent hearing.

What happens after the Board hears my claim?

No more than 45 days following the hearing, the Board Counsel prepares a Final Order detailing the determination of the Committee and informing you of your appellate rights. Both the claimant and the contractor will receive a copy of that Order. Either party may appeal the Order within 35 days of mailing. If there are no appeals, by law, the check may not be requested until 35 days from the filing date of the Order has elapsed. Once the appellate time has expired, you may be required to submit additional documentation, pursuant to Section 489.143 (3), before payment can be issued. Board staff will contact you once the appellate time has expired to instruct you on additional measures you may have to take. Once the check is ordered, it usually takes an additional 2-4 weeks to get the check from the Comptroller and mail the check to you.

CERTIFICATES OF AUTHORITY/QUALIFIED BUSINESS LICENSES

Effective October 1, 2009, the Department of Business and Professional Regulation will no longer issue Certificates of Authority (qualified business licenses). HB 425 eliminated the requirement for a separate business license for construction companies in Florida. Contractors will still be required to qualify construction businesses with their license and provide background information for the business they are seeking to qualify.

When does the new law take effect?

Beginning October 1, 2009 the Department of Business and Professional Regulation will not issue a separate certificate of authority (also known as “qualified business license”) for construction businesses.

Will contractors still be required to qualify a construction business?

Yes, contractors will still be required to qualify a construction business with their individual license.

Will contractors still be required to provide the same background information to qualify a business?

Yes, contractors will still be required to provide the same background information to qualify a construction company.

Will the name of the construction business be listed on the contractor’s license?

Yes, the name of the qualified business will continue to be placed on the contractor’s license.

What happens to my existing certificate of authority?

The certificate of authority will no longer be regarded as a license, but the business information will remain on the Department’s public website.

Will my application and renewal fees change?

The application fees for an initial contractor’s license or change of status will remain the same. However, beginning with the renewal cycle in the year 2011, all licenses that qualify a business entity will be assessed a business qualification fee of $50 in addition to the regular renewal fee.

SWIMMING POOL SPECIALTY CONTRACTOR

What Swimming Pool Specialty Licenses are available?

Layout, Structural, Excavation, Trim, Decking, Piping and Finishing licenses are available.  These are certified specialty licenses that enable the license holder to perform work statewide.

Are sub-contractors allowed to hold multiple licenses?

Yes, sub-contractors may hold multiple licenses. Sub-contractors must complete a separate application form for each license category that they are seeking – applications in which the applicant has checked more than one license category will not be processed. Each application must be accompanied by the applicable fees.

Applicants are required to pay the practical examiner examination fee. This fee must be paid each time an exam is taken. The examiner fee is determined by the examiner, with a maximum of $200.00 per exam.

May I contract directly with the public with a swimming pool specialty license?

No, you may only contract with a licensed commercial or residential pool/spa contractor, or a licensed swimming pool/spa servicing contractor.

Where can I find the license application form?

The application can be obtained online at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/. Download the form and check which license you are seeking on page 4 of the application. If you do not have internet access or if you need assistance, please call the department’s Customer Contact Center at 850.487.1395.

What do I have to do to get licensed?

To become licensed, you must:

  • Prove 4 years of experience in the category for which you are seeking licensure.
  • Take and pass an exam either a written or practical exam. Please note that the written exam is currently under development and not available at this time. Once it becomes available, information will be posted on the department’s website.
  • If you choose to take the practical exam you MUST also complete a minimum of 3 hours of continuing education from a provider approved by the Construction Industry Licensing Board, consisting of:
    1. 1 hour of workers compensation
    2. 1 hour of workplace safety
    3. 1 hour of business practice
  • Meet other licensing requirements such as good moral character and financial responsibility.
Where can I get a list and contact details for practical examiners?

The Construction Industry Licensing Board maintains a database of practical examiners that have taken the mandatory 2-hour course, which is available on the Construction Public Records webpage.

SWIMMING POOL SPECIALTY PRACTICAL EXAMINER

I’ve taken the 2-hour practical examiner course, what do I need to do to register as a practical examiner?

To register as a practical examiner, download the appropriate forms at http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

If you do not have internet access or if you need assistance, please call the department’s Customer Contact Center at 850.487.1395.

Applicants must also submit a certificate of completion, the registration form and $50.00 fee to the Construction Industry Licensing Board.

Are sub contractors allowed to hold multiple licenses?

Yes, sub-contractors may hold multiple licenses. Sub-contractors must complete a separate application form for each license category that they are seeking – applications in which the applicant has checked more than one license category will not be processed. Each application must be accompanied by the applicable fees.

Applicants are required to pay the practical examiner examination fee. This fee must be paid each time an exam is taken. The examiner fee is determined by the examiner, with a maximum of $200.00 per exam.

As a practical examiner do I need to keep records of the applicants proctored?

Yes. You need to maintain exam records for a minimum of two years.

What do I do once a practical exam has been completed?

Once a practical exam has been completed, notify the applicant in writing of a passing or failing score using a form provided by the Construction Industry Licensing Board. This must be done within seven days of exam completion.

Provide score sheets pursuant to the review and challenge procedure noted in the examiner materials.

As a practical examiner may I proctor my own sub-contractor?

No. You may not employ or contract with an applicant OR any other contractor on the site at which a practical exam is being administered.

May I administer an exam to more than one applicant at a time?

Yes. You may administer an exam to a maximum of five applicants at a time.

What do I need to do to become a practical examiner?

You are required to take a two hour Construction Industry Licensing Board (CILB) approved orientation course through an approved education provider. You must also:

  • Register with the CILB and pay a fee of $50.00;
  • Determine what fee you will charge, with a maximum of $200.00; and
  • Be a licensed commercial or residential pool/spa contractor.
What score is needed to achieve a passing grade on a practical exam?

A score of 70% is required to achieve a passing grade.

Am I allowed to be licensed in multiple sub-contractor categories?

Yes. You may be licensed in all seven categories.

I’m licensed in all 7 categories - may I build a pool from start to finish?

No, you must work under the supervision of registered or certified commercial or residential pool contractors. Sub-contractors may not contract with the homeowner or general contractor.

What type of work comes under the scope of this license?

A certified glass and glazing specialty contractor is a specialty statewide contractor whose services are unlimited in the execution of contracts requiring the experience, knowledge, and skill to install, attach, maintain, repair, fabricate, alter, extend or design, in residential and commercial applications without any height restrictions, all types of windows, glass and mirrors, whether fixed or movable; swinging or sliding glass doors attached to existing walls, floors, columns or other structural members of the building; glass holding or supporting mullions or horizontal bars; structurally anchored impactresistant opening protection attached to existing building walls, floors, columns or other structural members of the building; prefabricated glass, metal or plastic curtain walls; storefront frames or panels; shower and tub enclosures; metal fascias; and caulking incidental to such work and assembly.

Is a state certified glass and glazing specialty contractor’s license required to contract for non-structural glass and glazing work in Florida?

No, Senate Bill 704, which passed during the 2012 legislative session, removed the Certified Glass and Glazing Contractor category from the mandatory license types under 489.105, Florida Statutes. Therefore, a state certified license is not required to perform non-structural glass and glazing work such as installation of glass and mirrors. Please be aware that work such as installation of doors, windows, store front frames and structurally anchored opening protections will still require a Division I contractors license or an appropriate specialty contractors license. In addition, your local county or municipality may have a local license requirement for glass and glazing work with which must you still comply. please check with your local building department or licensing authority regarding any local license requirements.

Do I need a license to install/replace windows?

Yes, the Construction Industry Licensing Board determined window installation and replacement requires either a general, building or residential contractor license or a local license which includes window installation and replacement in its scope of work. In addition to those licenses, a certified glass and glazing specialty contractor may also install/replace windows.

Can my county or municipality still require me to have a license to perform glass and glazing work even though the Florida legislature removed the mandatory state license?

Yes, your local county or municipality may still have a local licensing law that requires you to have a either a local license or a state certified license to perform glass and glazing work in its jurisdiction. Each contractor should contact the counties and municipalities where he or she works to determine if licensure is still required to perform glass and glazing work in that jurisdiction. Local licensing requirements may be met by obtaining a local specialty license or by obtaining a state certified license or state certified specialty license in the appropriate contractor category.

If the Florida Legislature removed the mandatory state licensure requirements for glass and glazing contractors, why would I want to get the state certified glass and glazing specialty license now?

Your local county or municipality may still have a local licensing law that requires you to have a license to perform glass and glazing work in its jurisdiction. The state certified glass and glazing specialty license permits contractors to perform glass and glazing contracting work on a state wide basis without obtaining a separate local specialty license or local certificate of competency in each individual county or municipality.

If my county or municipality still has a local licensure requirement for glass and glazing contracting, can they require me to have their local specialty licenses or certificate of competency if I hold the state certified glass and glazing specialty contractor license?

No, the cities and counties cannot require a state certified contractor to obtain a local specialty licenses or certificate of competency to do work covered within the scope of his/her state certified license. Pursuant to Section 489.113(4)(a), Florida Statutes, a state certificate holder is only required to exhibit his state certificate to the local licensing authority and pay the occupational license fee(business tax certificate) and building permits fees to engage in contracting.

What if I already have a Certified Glass and Glazing Contractor (CGG) license issued under the old law?

On July 1, 2012, the Department will issue you a new certified glass and glazing specialty (SCC) license to replace your previous CGG license that is no longer valid.

What are the insurance requirements for this licensure category?

$100,000 liability insurance and $25,000 property damage insurance. If you would like to find out more about this license please contact the Department of Business and Professional Regulation at 850.487.1395 or go online to http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/construction-industry/.

Is demolition part of the licensed practice of contracting in the State of Florida?

Yes. Section 489.105(3), Florida Statutes, defines “contractor” as a person for compensation undertakes to, submits a bid to, or does himself or herself or by others construct, repair, alter, remodel, add to, demolish, subtract from, or improve any building or structure, including related improvements to real estate, for others or for resale to others. However, the term “demolish” applies only to demolition of steel tanks more than 50 feet in height; towers more than 50 feet in height; other structures more than 50 feet in height; and all buildings or residences. Therefore, an appropriate category of state contractor license or local certificate of competency must be obtained before you can offer to contract for demolition services as defined above.

Has the definition of demolition recently changed?

Yes, Senate Bill 704, which passed during the 2012 legislative session, changed the term “demolish” to apply to the demolition of all buildings or residences regardless of height or number of stories. Previously, a license was only required for the demolition of a building or residence when it was over 3 stories in height. Now, a state or local license is required to contract for the demolition of all buildings or residences

What type of license will allow me to contract for demolition services?

You may obtain either a certified or registered Division I contractor’s license, a state certified specialty contractors license or a local certificate of competency which corresponds to the type of building or structure being demolished. For instance, a certified or registered residential contractor’s license allows you to contract to demolish any residences which do need exceed 3 stories in height. A certified or registered building contractor’s license allows you to demolish any residence or commercial building that does not exceed 3 stories in height. A certified or registered general contractor’s license allows you to demolish any building, residence or structure, regardless of its height. A local specialty demolition contractor’s license (certificate of competency) would also permit you to contract for demolition services within the scope of that local license and only within that jurisdiction.

If I get a local demolition specialty contractor’s license (certificate of competency) issued by my local jurisdiction do I still need to obtain a state certification or registration?

No. If your local jurisdiction offers a demolition license, you may contract for services within the scope of that license without obtaining a state certification or registration. However, you may only contract for services within the jurisdiction that issued your local specialty demolition contractor’s license (certificate of competency).

What if my local jurisdiction does not offer a local specialty demolition license (certificate of competency)?

You will be required to obtain a certified or registered Division I contractor’s license (General, Building, or Residential) or a state certified specialty license corresponding to the types or buildings or structures you intend to demolish.

Can I subcontract to perform demolition work from a properly licensed contractor without obtaining a license?

Pursuant to Section 489.113 (2), Florida Statutes, as long as you have been subcontracted by an appropriately licensed Division I contractor and are working under the supervision of that licensee, you are not required to obtain licensure unless the work you are performing requires licensure under Section 489.105(3)(d)-(o), Florida Statutes.

For information related to obtaining a Division I contractor’s license please see the CILB FAQ’s.

What is a certified irrigation specialty contractor’s license?

An irrigation specialty contractor’s license is a certified (state wide) specialty license developed by the Construction Industry Licensing Board to permit contractors to install, maintain, repair, alter, extend, manage, monitor, audit, or, if not prohibited by law, design irrigation systems. You may find details regarding the full licensure scope for irrigation specialty contractors in Rule 61G4-15.035, F.A.C.

Does the licensure category create additional regulation of irrigation contractors?

No, pursuant to s. 489.1113(6), Florida Statutes, certified specialty contractor licenses do not create a mandatory licensing requirement. The new specialty license simply provides an alternative to obtaining a local irrigation contractors certificate of competency or a full certified plumbing contractor’s license.

Does my certified irrigation specialty contractor allow me to work on a state wide basis?

Yes, pursuant to s. 489.105(8), Florida Statutes, a certified contractor is permitted to contract in any jurisdiction in the state without being required to fulfill local competency requirements. Please be aware that you must still comply with permitting fees and pay the necessary occupational (business tax) fee.

May I contract directly with the public with a certified irrigation specialty license?

Yes, you may contract directly with consumers for irrigation services that are within the scope of the irrigation specialty contractor license defined above.

What do I have to do to get licensed?

To become licensed, you must:

  • Be 18 years of age or older;
  • Prove 4 years of experience in the category for which you are seeking licensure, including a minimum of one year as a foreman. You may substitute up to three years of accredited college level courses for years of experience.
  • Take and pass the Florida certified irrigation specialty contractors’ examination. Please note that the written examination is in the final stages of development and will be administered for the first time beginning April 16th and April 17th, 2013. For more information content and scheduling to take the state certification examination, please visit http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/examination-information/construction-examinations/ or call 850.488.5952.
  • Meet other licensing requirements such as good moral character and financial responsibility.
What is a certified residential pool/spa servicing specialty contractor’s license?

A certified residential pool/spa servicing specialty contractor’s license is a certified (state wide) specialty license developed by the Construction Industry Licensing Board to permit contractors to repair and servicing residential pools, spas and hot tubs. This license is limited to residential pool, spas, and hot tubs only. You may find details regarding the full licensure scope for residential pool/spa servicing specialty contractors in Rule 61G4-15.040, F.A.C.

Does the licensure category create additional regulation of pool contractors?

No, pursuant to s. 489.113(6), Florida Statutes, certified specialty contractor licenses do not create a mandatory licensing requirement. The new specialty license simply provides an alternative to obtaining a full certified swimming pool/spa servicing (commercial and residential) contractor’s license or local certificates of competency in residential pool/spa servicing.

Does my certified residential pool/spa servicing specialty contractor allow me to work on a state wide basis?

Yes, pursuant to s. 489.105(8), Florida statutes, a certified contractor is permitted to contract in any jurisdiction in the state without being required to fulfill local competency requirements. Please be aware that you must still comply with permitting fees and pay the necessary occupational (business tax) fee.

May I contract directly with the public with a certified residential pool/spa servicing specialty license?

Yes, you may contract directly with consumers for residential pool/spa servicing services that are within the scope of the residential pool/spa servicing specialty contractor license defined above.

Is the Residential Pool/Spa Servicing specialty Contractor different than the swimming pool specialty contractor licenses created under rule 61G4-15.032, F.A.C.?

Yes, swimming pool specialty contractors licensed pursuant to Rule 61G4-15.032, F.A.C., are not permitted to contract directly with the public and may only subcontract work from a license commercial pool/spa contractor, residential pool/spa contractor, swimming pool/spa servicing contractor, or a certified residential pool/spa servicing specialty contractor operating within the scope of their license. For additional information on these license types please see our Swimming Pool Specialty Contractors FAQs.

What do I have to do to get licensed?

To become licensed, you must:

  • Be 18 years of age or older
  • Prove 4 years of experience in the category for which you are seeking licensure, including a minimum of one year as a foreman. You may substitute up the three years of accredited college level courses for years of experience. You may also complete a 60 hour course in swimming pool/spa servicing approved by the CILB and have at least 1 year proven experience in the residential pool/spa servicing scope of work
  • Take and pass the Florida certified swimming pool/spa servicing contractors’ examination. For more information content and scheduling to take the state certification examination, please visit http://www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/examination-information/construction-examinations/ or call 850.488.5952
  • Meet other licensing requirements such as good moral character and financial responsibility.

What is a declaratory statement?

A declaratory statement is the sole means for a Florida licensed contractor or their representative to obtain a binding interpretation or opinion from the Florida Construction Industry Licensing Board (CILB) concerning the applicability of statutory provisions, rules or orders over which the CILB has authority.

Are there any limitations of what I can request a declaratory statement about?

Yes. A petition for declaratory statement may be used only to resolve questions or doubts as to how the statutes, rules, or orders may apply to the petitioner’s particular circumstances. A declaratory statement is not the appropriate means for determining the conduct of another person or for obtaining a policy statement of general applicability from an agency. A petition for declaratory statement must describe the potential impact of statutes, rules, or orders upon the petitioner’s interests.

Who will respond to my request for a declaratory statement?

Upon reaching a decision, the Construction Industry licensing Board will issue an Order setting forth its findings of fact and conclusions of law. A copy of the Order will be mailed to the Petitioner’s address. Issued Declaratory Statements can also be found on the board’s Declaratory Statements webpage.

How do I request a declaratory statement?

Section 120.565, Florida Statutes, and 28.105, Florida Administrative Code, set forth the requirements for filing a petition for declaratory statement from the CILB. You may request a declaratory statement from the board by filing a Petition for Declaratory Statement with the Department of Business and Professional Regulation’s Agency Clerk’s Office at:

Department of Business and Professional Regulation
Agency Clerk’s Office
2601 Blair Stone Road
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-2202
Telephone: 850.921.0342
Facsimile: 850.488.5761
Email: AGC.Filing@myfloridalicense.com

Requests for filings may be submitted by hand delivery, regular mail, email or facsimile transmission. Filings will be accepted during business hours; requests received after 5:00 p.m. will be filed on the next regular business day.

Do I need to appear when the CILB reviews my Petition for Declaratory Statement?

No, you are not required to appear at the Board’s meeting. However, your appearance is recommended in the event that the Board has questions regarding your petition.

Need Help?

All requests for publications, documents, forms, applications for licenses, permits and other similar certifications can be obtained by contacting the Customer Contact Center.

Division of Professions
Construction Industry Licensing Board
2601 Blair Stone Road
Tallahassee, FL 32399-0791

Telephone: 850.487.1395
Facsimile: 850.488.8040