Services Require a DBPR License

The businesses and professions listed below are licensed and regulated by the Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation. If you have any questions about whether a specific service, establishment, or individual may require a license, please contact our Customer Contact Center at 850.487.1395.

Alcoholic Beverages and Tobacco

A license or permit is required for any business or person to manufacture, import, export, store, distribute or sell alcoholic beverages or tobacco.  This includes bottle club establishments that operate for a profit wherein patrons consume alcoholic beverages which are brought onto the premises and are not sold or supplied to the patrons by the establishment.  In addition, wine and spirits salespersons must be licensed. Alcoholic beverages are defined as any distilled spirit and all beverages containing one-half of one percent or more alcohol by volume. A permit is required for any business or person to engage in business as a manufacturer, importer, exporter, distributing agent, or wholesale dealer of cigarettes; for distributors, makers, manufacturers or fabricators of other tobacco products within the state and for distributors of cigars within the state.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
 Manufacturers/distillers, rectifiers or blenders of spirits Makers of beer or wine for personal or family consumption which is not for sale and is within the amounts provided by 562.165, Florida Statutes
 Manufactures/brewers of malt beverages Other tobacco product manufacturers and importers not located within the state
 Manufacturers of wines 
 Importers or Exporters of alcoholic beverages 
 Distributors of alcoholic beverages 
 Vendors of alcoholic beverages, cigarettes or tobacco products 
 Commercial bottle clubs 
 Wine and Spirits Brokers or sales agents 
 Manufacturers, Importers, Exporters, Distributing Agents and Wholesale Dealers of cigarettes 
Wholesale dealers of other tobacco products 
Makers, Manufactures or Fabricators of other tobacco products within the state 

Architects

An Architect is someone who offers services in connection with the design and construction of commercial buildings and structures that are primarily where people live and work.  Services include planning, providing preliminary study designs, drawings and specifications, job-site inspection, and administration of construction contracts.  If you are going to hire someone to perform these services they need to be licensed. Important Note:  The services that require licensure may be performed by other properly licensed individuals in certain circumstances.  For example, an engineer may perform architectural services that are incidental to his/her engineering practice.  However, the engineer may not use the term “architect.”  A general contractor may perform design-build services, so long as he/she utilizes the services of a licensed architect.  Please contact your local building department for clarification prior to entering into contracts for the services listed below. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Design a shopping mall.Design a one-family or two-family residence or townhouse.
Design an apartment complex.An appurtenance (something added) to any one-family or two-family residence.
Design a high-rise office building. Design a building on a farm for use by the farmer.
  Design any other type of building costing less than $25,000, except a school, auditorium or other building intended for public use.

Asbestos Contractors and Consultants

An Asbestos Contractor is a person who removes, encapsulates, or encloses asbestos-containing materials or disposes of asbestos-containing waste in the course of activities including, but not limited to, construction, renovation, maintenance, or demolition. An Asbestos consultant is a person who conducts surveys for asbestos-containing materials, develops operation and maintenance plans, monitors and evaluates asbestos abatement, prepares asbestos abatement specifications, or performs related tasks. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Conduct an asbestos survey, develop an operation and maintenance plan, monitor and evaluate asbestos abatement or prepare abatement specifications.Work performed by an employee of the United States, a Florida county, or a municipality who has completed training described in Chapter 469.002, F.S. and performs work solely for his/her employer.
Conduct asbestos abatement.A certified or registered roofing contractor who moves, removes or disposes of asbestos-containing roofing materials.
 Removal or disposal of asbestos containing resilient floor covering or its adhesive as described in Chapter 469.002, F.S.
 Abatement of asbestos containing pipe or conduit as described in chapter 469.002, F.S.

Athlete Agents

An Athlete Agent is a person who, directly or indirectly, recruits or solicits a student athlete* to enter into an agent contract for compensation.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc.  It also includes anyone who procures, offers, promises, or attempts to obtain employment or promotional fees or benefits for a student athlete with a professional sports team or as a professional athlete, or with any promoter who markets or attempts to market the student athlete’s athletic ability or athletic reputation. *A “Student Athlete” means any student who: Has informed, in writing, a college or university in Florida of the student’s intent to participate in that school’s intercollegiate athletics, or who does participate in that school’s intercollegiate athletics and is eligible to do so. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license. Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Enter into a contract with a student athlete for compensation.Acting on behalf of a student athlete if you are a spouse, parent, sibling, grandparent or guardian of a student athlete, or an individual acting solely on behalf of a professional sports team or organization (e.g. coaches, owners, scouts).
Promote or market a student athlete or his athletic reputation or attempts to obtain employment or promotional fees or benefits for a student athlete for any type of compensation.Contact or represent a student whose college eligibility has expired, regardless of compensation.

Auctioneers

An Auctioneer is someone who is paid to auction someone’s property for compensation.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc.  During an auction, bidders attempt to win items by placing the highest bid.  Usually, the auctioneer is paid a percentage of the auction selling price by the property owner and may receive a buyer’s premium or surcharge from the winning bidder. Prior to the auction, the auctioneer and owner must sign a written agreement stating the terms or conditions upon which the auctioneer or auction business will receive the property for sale and remit the sales proceeds to the owner.  The auctioneer must also state the terms of bidding and the amount of the buyer’s premium or surcharge prior to the start of the auction.  A person may not operate an auction or auction business without first obtaining a license from the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Conduct an auction to sell someone’s Property for compensation.Acting on behalf of a student athlete if you are a spouse, parent, sibling, grandparent or guardian of a student athlete, or an individual acting solely on behalf of a professional sports team or organization (e.g. coaches, owners, scouts).
Advertise an auction of items for sale.Auctions conducted as part of the sale of real property by a real estate broker.
 Auctions conducted by a charitable, civic or religious organization, or for such organization by someone who receives no compensation.

Barbers

Barbering includes cutting, trimming, coloring, arranging, dressing, curling, or waving the hair or beard or applying oils, creams, lotions, or other preparations to the face, scalp, or neck for compensation.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc.  Except for shampooing and conditioning, if you are paying for any barbering services, you need to hire a licensee.  A “restricted barber” is an individual who can cut hair and shave but is not allowed to perform any chemical services.  Examples of chemical services include coloring and applying highlights. Also, all barbering services are required to be performed in a licensed barbershop.  If you are unable to get to a licensed barbershop for a barber service due to an illness (for example, you are in the hospital or you are at home because of illness), the barber or restricted barber can come to you to perform the service. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Cut hair or trim a beard or mustache for compensation.Any barbering services as long as no form of compensation is received for the service.
Color hair for compensation.Shampoo or condition hair only (cannot rinse chemicals such as color, permanent wave solution, etc.).
 Permanent wave, relax, or straighten hair for compensation. 
Perform a facial shave for compensation. 

Florida State Boxing Commission

The function of the Florida State Boxing Commission is to license and regulate professional boxing, kickboxing and mixed martial arts within the State of Florida.  The statutes and rules governing this profession are in Chapter 548, Florida Statutes, and Rule 61K-1, Florida Administrative Code.  The Commission has exclusive jurisdiction over every match held within the state which involves a professional.  The Commission also has exclusive jurisdiction over approval, disapproval, suspension of approval, and revocation of approval of all amateur sanctioning organizations for amateur boxing and kickboxing matches held in this state. Amateur:  A person who has never received nor competed for any purse or other article of value, either for the expenses of training or for participating in a match, other than a prize of $50 in value or less. Professional:  A person who has received or competed for any purse or other article of a value greater than $50, either for the expenses of training or for participating in any match. A participant, promoter, manager, trainer, second, time-keeper, referee, judge, announcer, physician and match-maker all require a license. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the Commission at 850.488.8500 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com. Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
A participant, manager, trainer, second, time-keeper, referee, judge, announcer, physician, match-maker, directly or indirectly acting in any match involving a participant.A match conducted or sponsored by a bona fide nonprofit school or education program whose primary purpose is instruction in the martial arts, boxing, or kickboxing, if the match held in conjunction with the instruction is limited to amateur participants who are students of the school or instructional program.
A promoter who, directly or indirectly, promotes matches involving a professional.  No promoter may be associated with any foreign co-promoter in promoting any match unless the foreign co-promoter has been issued a license.A match conducted or sponsored by any company or detachment of the Florida National Guard, if the match is limited to participants who are members of the company or detachment of the Florida National Guard.
A foreign co-promoter who, directly or indirectly, participates in the promotion of, receives any remuneration from, or renders any services in connection with any match involving a professional. A match conducted or sponsored by the Fraternal Order of Police, if the match is limited to amateur participants and is held in conjunction with a charitable event.
Any match involving amateurs which utilizes, but is not necessarily limited to, strikes or blows to the head must be sanctioned and supervised by an amateur sanctioning organization approved by the commission. 

Building Code Administrators and Inspectors

A Building Code Administrator or Building Official is responsible for direct administration or supervision of plan review, enforcement, or inspection of building construction that requires permitting to indicate compliance with building codes. A Building Inspector is someone who inspects building construction for compliance with building codes.  A Plans Examiner is a person who is qualified to determine that plans submitted for purposes of obtaining building permits comply with building codes. Building code administrators, building officials, building inspectors, and plans examiners are generally employed by county and municipal governments.  In some cases they are private providers.  However, both government employees and private providers must be licensed. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Perform inspections of the structural, roofing, electrical, plumbing, and mechanical work on a house or building being constructed or renovated, regardless of compensation. 

Certified Public Accountants

A Certified Public Accountant (CPA) is someone who has passed the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) Uniform CPA examination, met educational, and licensure requirements in the state of Florida and have been issued a license to practice public accounting.  CPAs provide accounting, auditing, tax, financial planning, and management consulting services.  Florida CPA firms must be licensed and CPAs can only practice in a licensed firm. Please note that the items below are merely offered as examples of work that requires and does not require a license.  The list is not all inclusive.  Under certain circumstances, a CPA who holds an active license in good standing from another jurisdiction and does not have an office in Florida could practice in Florida without notification or fee under mobility provisions. For more information please visit our webpage. You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  If you have specific questions, please contact the Department at 850.487.1395. Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Perform audits, reviews, and compilations Prepare a tax return for yourself or others or providing advice as to federal tax matters.
Express an opinion of financial statements that provide a level of assurance as to the reliability or fairness of the financial information.Perform basic bookkeeping or accounting functions.
Use the CPA designation 
Advertise or represent oneself as a CPA 

Community Association Managers

Florida Statutes define the term “Community association management” to mean management of community associations for compensation when the association or associations served contain more than 10 units or have an annual budget or budgets in excess of $100,000. Florida Statutes define the term “community association management firm” to mean a business that engages in the business of community association management as defined above.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc. A community association management firm must be licensed, and each community association manager within the firm must be licensed. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Provide community association management for all community associations with more than 10 units for compensation.Providing management services as a volunteer for no compensation.
Provide community association management for all community associations with a budget in excess of $100,000 for compensation. 

Construction Industry

A Contractor is someone who demolishes, subtracts from, builds or improves any building or structure for compensation.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc.  Essentially, if you pay someone to construct a building or a structure, make structural alterations to load bearing walls, or perform services such as plumbing or air conditioning work, that person has to have a state contractors’ license. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license. Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Build a carport or sunroom for compensation.Install a driveway or install pavers/tile walkways regardless of compensation.
Construct a roof for compensation. Install awnings that do not become a fixed part of the structure regardless of compensation.
Install a dishwasher (requires connecting to drinking water) or replace a hot-water heater for compensation.Add a water filter onto a faucet regardless of compensation.
Install a central air-conditioning unit for compensation (requires structural work and wiring).Insert a plug-in A/C window unit regardless of compensation.
Clean central air and heat ducts for compensation (requires partial disassembly of the system, such as removal of air grills).Change an A/C filter or cleaning ducts that do not require removal of the air grills regardless of compensation.
Repair or replace swimming pool pumps for compensation.

Clean swimming pools. Install an above-ground pool regardless of compensation.

Perform plumbing work or irrigation installation that requires the contractor to connect lines to potable (drinking) water for compensation. Install or repair irrigation systems that have a backflow preventer connected to a potable (drinking) water supply regardless of compensation.
Build a barn, metal building, or detached garage for compensation. Install prefabricated tool shed less than 250 square feet in size regardless of compensation. The shed may be up to 400 square feet if it bears the insignia of approval from the Department of Community Affairs.
Remodel a home that requires alteration or replacement of a load-bearing wall for compensation. Paint; install cabinets, wood or tile flooring, and insulation regardless of compensation.
Installation or replacement of drywall if the contract also includes work on the load bearing part of the wall, plumbing, electrical, or air conditioning work. Installation or replacement of drywall if the contract does not include other work on the load bearing part of the wall or any plumbing, electrical, or air conditioning work.

Cosmetology

Cosmetology includes services such as hair cutting, hair arranging, hair coloring, permanent waving, and hair relaxing for compensation.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc.  It also includes performing hair removal, including wax treatments, manicures, pedicures, and skin care services.  Except for shampooing and conditioning, if you are providing anything of value for cosmetology services, you need to hire a licensed person. Also, all compensated cosmetology services, with the exception of hair braiding, hair wrapping and body wrapping, must be performed in a licensed cosmetology salon.  If a customer cannot get to a licensed salon for a cosmetology service due to an illness (for example, hospitalization or being home bound), the cosmetology specialist can perform the service in an alternative setting. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Cut, color or arrange hair for compensation.Any cosmetology services as long as no compensation is received for the service.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc.
Permanent wave, relax, or straighten hair for compensation.Apply makeup for no compensation or apply makeup at a makeup counter or for an independent makeup company so long as the makeup application is solely for the purpose of selling the product and not for selling the service.
Add nail extensions or caps for compensation.Shampoo or condition hair only (cannot rinse chemicals such as color, permanent wave solution, etc.).
Remove or add nail polish to fingernails or toenails for compensation.Provide wig/hair piece fitting service, in conjunction with the sale of the wig/hair piece as long as no cosmetology services are performed (e.g., hair cutting, shaping, coloring, etc.).
Perform facials for compensation. 
Performs pedicuring, or the shaping, polishing, tinting, or cleansing of the nails of the feet, and massaging or beautifying of the feet for compensation. 
Apply makeup for compensation. 
Perform sugaring for compensation. 
Perform threading for compensation. 
Tweeze or wax facial hair for compensation. 
Add eyelash extensions for compensation. 
Perform hair braiding for compensation. 
Perform hair wrapping for compensation. 
Perform body wrapping for compensation. 
Cut, color, blow dry, or arrange hair for compensation. 

Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics Program

The Division of Drugs, Devices and Cosmetics safeguards the health, safety, and welfare of the citizens of the state of Florida from injury due to the use of adulterated, contaminated, misbranded drugs, drug ingredients and cosmetics by administering the provisions of the Florida Drug and Cosmetic Act (Chapter 499, F.S.). The Program carries out its responsibilities through three bureaus: Compliance & Enforcement, Licensing and Legal.

Legislative House Bill 211 (2017)

On June 2, 2017, Governor Rick Scott signed House Bill 211 (2017) regarding cosmetic product registration and issuance of certificates of free sale.  Pursuant to the terms of the bill, effective July 1, 2017, Florida’s cosmetic manufacturers will no longer be required to register their cosmetic products with the department before offering them for sale. Based on the removal of Florida’s cosmetic product registration requirements, the Division of Drugs, Devices, and Cosmetics has ceased enforcement of product registration requirements for cosmetics.  Beginning July 1, 2017, the Division will no longer accept applications for issuance of product registrations or certificates of free sale for cosmetic products. Cosmetic manufacturers will still be required to be permitted and meet all the Federal Food and Drug Administration requirements for safe manufacturing and labeling of their cosmetic products. If you have any questions regarding cosmetic product registrations or the effect of the bill, please contact the Division of Drugs, Devices, and Cosmetics at 850.717.1800.


CANCER DRUG DONATION PROGRAM

The CDDP was created during the 2006 Legislative Session with the passage of House Bill 371, which was sponsored by Representative Gayle Harrell. The purpose of the CDDP is to provide access to the drugs and supplies used to treat cancer to patients who are uninsured and do not qualify for Medicare, third-party insurance or any other state or federal programs. Section 499.029, F.S., authorizes the donation of cancer drugs and supplies by any person or entity to a participant facility for re-dispensing to an eligible recipient.


CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES REPORTING

Effective July 1, 2011, in accordance with Section 499.0121(14), Florida Statutes, certain controlled substance distributors must submit monthly distribution reports to the department.  The affected companies distribute controlled substances (Schedules II-V, inclusive) in or into Florida.  To find out whether your company must report and for more information click here. _________________________________________________________________________

DRUG WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTOR ADVISORY COUNCIL

The Drug Wholesale Distributor Advisory Council is comprised of 11 members representing various aspects of the industry. See 499.01211, F.S., for the specific qualifications to serve on the council. The Council’s role is to review Chapter 499, Part I, and the rules, provide input to the department regarding all proposed rules, make recommendations to the department to improve the protection of the prescription drugs and public health, make recommendations to improve coordination with other states’ regulatory agencies and the federal government concerning the wholesale distribution of drugs, and make recommendations to minimize the impact of regulation of the wholesale distribution industry while ensuring protection of the public health. Council Members and Meeting Information


Online Renewal Process

Please go to www.myfloridalicense.com to renew a license online. Click here for renewal procedure.


To sign up for email alerts or notifications, please visit http://myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/drugs-devices-and-cosmetics/forms-and-publications/. NOTICE OF WORKERS’ COMPENSATION EXEMPTION LAW CHANGE


Attach File System https://attach.dbpr.state.fl.us

Electrical and Alarm Contractors

An Electrical Contractor installs, repairs, alters, adds to, or designs electrical wiring, fixtures, or appliances, which generate, transmit, transform, or utilize electrical energy for compensation. An alarm contractor lays out, fabricates, installs, maintains, alters, repairs, monitors, inspects, replaces, or services alarm systems for compensation.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc.  If you pay someone to perform even the simplest of electrical work, such as connecting two wires, you must hire a licensee. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Install ceiling fans and light fixtures for compensation.Change the light bulbs in fixtures.
Install or replace electric outlets and switches for compensation.Change the cover plates on outlets.
Install or monitor alarms systems for compensation.Set up home theater components (excluding wiring).
Install cable or satellite television wiring for compensation.Hang a flat screen TV on a wall.
Install computer network wiring for compensation. Set up wireless computer networks.
  Install solar powered landscape lighting or low voltage landscaping lighting with a factory installed cord and plug as described in 489.503 (24), F.S.

Elevators and Other Conveyances, Technicians, Inspectors and Companies

An elevator or other conveyance transports people or goods from one location to another location, often vertically between floors. Examples of other conveyances are escalators, moving walkways, dumbwaiters, and chairlifts. A certified elevator technician constructs, installs, maintains, or repairs elevators and other conveyances regulated under chapter 399, Florida Statutes. A certified elevator inspector constructs, installs, maintains, repairs or inspects elevators and other conveyances regulated under chapter 399, Florida Statutes. A registered elevator company obtains permits and employs persons to construct, install, inspect, maintain or repair elevators and other conveyances. A registered elevator company must obtain a permit before constructing, installing or altering an elevator or other conveyance. The Bureau of Elevator Safety contracts licensing, permitting, and inspection responsibilities to certain local jurisdictions. Elevators and other conveyances regulated under chapter 399, Florida Statutes, located in a contracted local jurisdiction must obtain the appropriate permit or license from the local jurisdiction. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to have a license or hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to have a license or hire a person with a Florida license. The list is not all inclusive. If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com. You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt is required. Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Elevator or escalator in a government building, office building, condominium building, apartment building, or mall, including freight elevatorsElevator in a private, single-family residence.
Moving walkway at an airport or theme parkAutomated people movers at airports, such as automated trams or trains
DumbwaiterHand-operated dumbwaiter
Inclined stairway chairlift, or inclined or vertical wheelchair liftStairway chairlift or wheelchair lift in a private, single-family residence
Portable escalators covered by the Florida Building CodeTemporary construction lifts, automobile parking lifts, portable lifts, cranes, hoists
 Installing, maintaining, repairing, or inspecting an elevator or other conveyance that requires a licenseA trainee or apprentice working on an elevator under the direct supervision of a certificate of competency holder
Replacing a light fixtureReplacing a light bulb in an elevator cab
Painting/cleaning elevator car-tops or elevator machine roomsPainting/cleaning elevator pits
Replacing the interior finish of an elevator cab 
Replacing wiring, fixtures, or cables in hoistway or elevator pits 

Employee Leasing Companies

An Employee Leasing Company is a business entity that enters a contract with a client business to assign its employees to the client.  The Employee Leasing Company and client share the direction of, and control over, the leased employees. A Controlling Person is a person who manages the Employee Leasing Company. Employee Leasing Companies are different from temporary agencies.  Temporary agencies assign workers to supplement an employer’s workforce on a temporary or seasonal basis.  The temporary agency has direct control over the employees and pays them directly.  Temporary employees are basically freelance workers.  An employee leasing company employee may work for a client employer indefinitely. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license. Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
To advertise to the public as an employee leasing company or to use  titles such as “professional employer,” “professional employer organization,” or “controlling person.”To operate a temporary agency.
To manage employee payroll, workers’ compensation insurance, withholding tax and other personnel matters as part of a contractual agreement with a client company.To operate a home health agency.  A home health agency is an organization that provides home health services, including staffing services, to health care facilities, schools, or other entities on a temporary or school-year basis pursuant to contract.
 To operate a payroll management company (strictly limited to payroll).
 To operate as an employment broker.  An employment broker is a person that markets job seekers for potential employment.

Geologists

A Geologist is someone, based upon knowledge of geology, soils, mathematics, and the physical and life sciences, practices or performs geological services, including, but not limited to, consultation, investigation, evaluation, planning, and geologic mapping.  A Geologist Business is business entity engaged in the practice or performance of geology.  A licensed geologist must act as the business’ qualifying agent. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Advertising or representing oneself to be a professional geologist.Teaching or researching in the science of geology that does not affect the health, safety and welfare of the public.
Performing any geological service or work recognized as professional geology.Working solely as an officer or employee of a governmental entity.
 Working solely as an employee of an employer that is engaged in the business of developing, mining, treatment of ores, other minerals, and petroleum.

Harbor Pilots

Harbor Piloting is the act of maneuvering vessels through the pilotage waters of the state.  In general, all foreign-flag vessels and United States-flag vessels with a draft of seven feet or greater (cruise ships, container ships, tankers, etc.) are required to have a Florida-licensed pilot onboard while maneuvering in Florida waters. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Pilot vessels (foreign-flagged and United States-flagged ships drawing a draft of seven feet or greater) utilizing the navigable waters of the state.Operate a small, personal pleasure craft.
 Pilot a United States Military vessel.

Home Inspectors

A Home Inspector is someone who provides, or offers to provide, a limited visual examination of the readily accessible installed systems and components of a home, which include the structure, electrical system, HVAC system, roof covering, plumbing system, interior components, exterior components, and site conditions that affect the structure, for the purposes of providing a written professional opinion of the condition of the home. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Advertising or representing oneself to be a Home Inspector.If a written professional opinion of the home regarding its condition is not provided.
 Performing work as a home inspector when not acting within the scope of a local, state, or federal license.Working solely as an officer or employee of a governmental entity.

Hotels, Motels, Apartments and other lodging

A public lodging establishment is any unit, group of units, dwelling, building or group of buildings within a single complex of buildings which is rented to guests or advertised as rented to guests as a transient or nontransient establishment. A transient establishment is a public lodging establishment rented for less than 30 days or one month for transient occupancy with the intent that the guest’s stay will be temporary.  Examples of transient public lodging are hotels, motels, bed and breakfast inns, rooming houses, vacation condominiums, vacation houses, and apartments. A nontransient establishment is a public lodging establishment rented for at least 30 days or one month for nontransient occupancy with the intent that the residence will be the guest’s sole residence.  Examples of nontransient public lodging establishments are apartments or townhouses with more than four units. These items are offered as examples of lodging that need a DBPR license and lodging that does not need a DBPR license. The list is not all inclusive. If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the business type at www.myfloridalicense.com. You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt is required. Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Hotel, motel, inn, bed and breakfast, or resortCollege dormitory, mobile home park, trailer park, RV park or health care facility
Apartment building with 5 or more apartments advertised or rented for nontransient occupancyApartment building with 4 or fewer apartments advertised or rented for nontransient occupancy
Single apartment, townhouse, or apartment building advertised or rented for transient occupancySubleasing your apartment or renting a room in your house for nontransient occupancy
Group of single family homes, duplexes, triplexes, or quadruplexes with 5 or more rental units on property owned or operated by a single entity and advertised or rented for nontransient occupancyDetention facility or court ordered recovery facility or half-way house
Single family house, condominium or timeshare advertised or rented for transient occupancySingle family house or single condominium in a building rented for nontransient occupancy or under a rent to own contract
Condominium or timeshare building with 5 or more units owned or operated by a single entity and advertised or rented for nontransient occupancyCondominium rented as transient housing by a Condominium Association as defined in Chapter 718.103, F.S. if the Condominium Association does not own the unit
Duplex, triplex or quadruplex advertised or rented for transient occupancyProviding no-cost shelter for homeless persons
Group of 5 or more attached townhouses owned or operated by a single entity and advertised or rented for nontransient occupancyMigrant labor camps or migrant housing permitted by the Department of Health
 Boat of any kind providing lodging accommodations
 Any establishment operated by a Public Housing Authority regulated under Chapter 421, F.S.
 Any lodging establishment on a military base
 Housing managed by a non-profit organization for use by patients and patients’ families and caregivers only.

Interior Design

An Interior Designer is someone who designs, or provides consultation, drawings, specifications and administration of design construction contracts relating to nonstructural interior elements of a commercial building or structure.  Interior design includes reflected ceiling plans (a scale diagram of a room or building drawn as if seen from above), space planning, furnishings and the fabrication of nonstructural elements within and surrounding interior spaces of building.  If you are going to hire someone to design the interior of a commercial structure he/she needs to be licensed. Important Note:  The services rendered that require licensure may be performed by licensed architects.  Anyone who performs interior decorating or design services for residential purposes is not required to be licensed.*  Residential work includes residence buildings, single-family homes, multifamily homes, townhouses, apartments, condominiums, and domestic outbuildings appurtenant to one-family or two-family residences.  However, it does not include common areas associated with multiple-unit residences.  Please contact your local building department for clarification prior to entering into contracts for the services listed below. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Interior design of commercial structures, including space planning, draperies, flooring, etc.Interior decorating or interior design of residences.*
Interior design of common areas of multiple-unit dwellings, such as clubhouses, lobbies, laundry rooms, swimming pool areas, etc. 

* Federal District Judge Robert L. Hinkle has entered an order, Opinion on the Merits, in the case of Locke v. Shore in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida. Under this ruling a person must be a registered interior designer to provide commercial interior design services in the State of Florida. However, any person may use the title “interior designer” regardless of whether or not they hold a Florida license. A person may provide residential interior design services and may advertise herself/himself as an “interior designer” without a license. This ruling does not change the statutes in Chapter 481 but does impact how the Board enforces the statutes.

Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture includes consultation, planning, design, and preparation of drawings, specifications, contract documents and reports, responsible construction supervision, or landscape management in connection with the planning and development of land and incidental water areas, where the dominant purpose is the preservation, conservation, enhancement, or determination of proper land uses, natural land features, ground cover and plantings.  Landscape Architecture also includes Xeriscape, which is landscape that conserves water, protects the environment and is adaptable to local conditions, and is drought tolerant. If you are going to hire and compensate someone to draw plans for the planning and development of land and water areas he/she needs to be licensed.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc. Important Note:  The services rendered that require licensure may be performed by other properly licensed individuals in conjunction with projects, such as engineers and architects.  Services may also be provided by design-build contractors who retain the services of a licensed landscape architect.  Please contact your local building department for clarification prior to entering into contracts for the services listed below. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Design landscape that provides for drainage and run-off that limits erosion.Landscape design, which is the design of planting plans and installing plants.
Design landscape that provides for drainage and run-off that limits erosion. Design of a golf course.
 Landscape architectural services performed by employees of municipal or county governments (cannot use the title “landscape architect”).
 Lawn maintenance.

Mold-Related Services

Mold-Related Services are assessment and remediation of mold. An assessment of mold is a process performed by a mold assessor that includes the physical sampling and detailed evaluation of data obtained from a building history and inspection to formulate an initial hypothesis about the origin, identity, location, and extent of amplification of mold growth of greater than 10 square feet. A remediation of mold is the removal, cleaning, sanitizing, demolition, or other treatment, including preventive activities, of mold or mold-contaminated matter of greater than 10 square feet that was not purposely grown at that location; however, such removal, cleaning, sanitizing, demolition, or other treatment, including preventive activities, may not be work that requires a license under Chapter 489, Florida Statutes, unless performed by a person who is licensed under that chapter or the work complies with that chapter. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Advertising or representing oneself to be a Mold Assessor or Remediator.A residential property owner who performs mold assessment or remediation on his or her own property.
Taking samples for purposes of testing for the presence of mold.A person who performs mold assessment or remediation on property owned or leased by the person, the person’s employer, or an entity affiliated with the person’s employer through common ownership. This exemption does not apply if the person, employer, or affiliated entity engages in the business of performing mold assessment for the public.
 A person who performs mold assessment or remediation on property operated or managed by the person’s employer or an entity affiliated with the person’s employer through common ownership. This exemption does not apply if the person, employer, or affiliated entity engages in the business of performing mold assessment for the public.
 A person working solely as an officer or employee of a governmental entity.

Pari-Mutuel Wagering Facilities

LICENSING

Pari-Mutuel Wagering and Cardroom Licensing Slot Machine Gaming Licensing Permit Holder Application Information   Electronic Fingerprinting The Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR) requires that new applicants be fingerprinted. Electronic submission of physical fingerprint cards is a convenient option for applicants for licensure.

  • Applicants can use any Livescan service provider that has been approved by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement to submit their fingerprints to the Department.   FDLE Approved Vendors
  • Electronic fingerprinting reduces the likelihood of illegible fingerprints and will reduce the overall application processing time.
  • Electronic fingerprints can be retained for future submissions, saving time and money.
  • Applicants are responsible for vendor fees and providing the correct ORI # to the vendor: FL920630Z  Pari-Mutuel Wagering and Cardroom Licensing      FL923230Z  Slot Machine Gaming Licensing

Note: Renewal applicants with no lapse in licensure may already have retained fingerprints on file.  Applicants for PMW General or Professional Occupational Licenses over the age of 70 will have a record check rather than fingerprints. Frequently Asked Questions   www.myfloridalicense.com/dbpr/servop/testing/documents/finger_faq.pdf

Real Estate

A Real Estate Broker is an individual or entity that performs the services of real estate on behalf of another person, for compensation. The term “real estate” is defined in statute to include both interest in land or real property and business opportunities. The term “compensation” includes monetary compensation as well as valuable consideration, which includes benefits other than cash or tangible goods. Sales associates are individuals who are allowed to perform these services but only at the direction and control of a real estate broker or for their registered owner developer. Important Note Regarding Unlicensed Assistants: The Florida Real Estate Commission has outlined permissible activities which an unlicensed assistant working in cooperation with a licensed individual may do. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the statutes and rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Appraising or attempts to appraise real property for another for compensation excludes services that must be performed by a Licensed or Certified Appraiser under Chapter 475, Part II, Florida Statutes.A salaried employee of an owner of an apartment community working in an onsite rental office.
Auctioning or attempts to auction real property of another for compensation.The owner of a timeshare period who later offers the timeshare period for resale.
 Selling or attempts to sell real property of another for compensation.Any person or business entity that rents or advertises for rent a public lodging establishment properly licensed in Chapter 509.241, Florida Statutes.
 Buying or attempts to buy real property of another for compensation.A tenant in an apartment complex who receives a referral or finders fee, not to exceed $50, for the referral of a tenant. However, the tenant may not advertise or otherwise promote the service of finding a potential resident.
Renting or Leasing or attempts to rent or lease real property of another for compensation.The owner of real property who offers the real property for resale.
Advertising or attempts to advertise real property of another for compensation. 
Representing that you are engaged in the business of brokerage activity. 
Undertaking to list or sell one or more timeshare periods per year on behalf of another individual or entity for compensation. 

Restaurants, Take-outs, Delivery, Caterers and Mobile Food Vendors

A public food service establishment is a building, vehicle, place or structure where food is prepared, served, or sold for consumption at or near the establishment or as take out, or is prepared and delivered to a different location for consumption. The Department of Business and Professional Regulation (DBPR), the Department of Health and the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services regulate different parts of the retail food service industry.  DBPR’s Division of Hotels and Restaurants handles public food service establishments that prepare and serve food to the public including restaurants, mobile food dispensing vehicles, theme park food services and temporary food service event vendors. The Department of Health and the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services also regulate food services.  The Department of Health handles drink-only bars and institutions that serve a limited population including nursing homes, hospitals, schools, correction and detention facilities, adult day care centers, church kitchens, and civic and fraternal organizations.  The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services handles wholesalers and food retailers including grocery and convenience stores, food manufacturing or processing plants, food warehouses, bakeries, and fish and meat markets. These items are offered as examples of services for which you do or do not need a public food service license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for public food service establishments at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with the Department of Health and the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to learn if a permit is required for activities that do not require a DBPR license. You should also check with your county or city to learn whether a local business tax receipt is required.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Any establishment preparing and serving food to the public such as a restaurant, fast food service, café, sandwich shop, bar or lounge, or food service in a mall, food court, or flea market.Any food establishment regulated by the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services or the Department of Health, including specific types of food service listed below.
Ice cream store serving scooped ice cream.Ice cream store serving only packaged ice cream.
Snack bar at a bowling alley, arcade, or office building.Donut shop, bagel shop, or candy store.
Country club or yacht club serving food.Civic organizations such as Little League  and fraternal organizations such as the VFW.
“Take and Bake” food service where customers assemble and package a meal to be cooked at home.Preparing or serving only beverages, ice, popcorn or prepackaged foods.
Food service in a public lodging establishment, including bed and breakfast inns and continental breakfast in a hotel or motel. Food service in a school dormitory, child care facility, migrant labor camp or culinary school.
Food service in a public venue such as a zoo, aquarium, sports stadium or arena, theme park or entertainment complex. Potluck dinner held in a community clubhouse by residents for residents and resident’s guests only.
Test kitchen open to the public – even if by special invitation only. Test kitchens open only for employee use and not open to the general public.
Selling or serving hot dogs from a cart or vehicle that meets MFDV requirements, including trucks and boats.Vehicle selling or serving only packaged food such as an ice cream truck or lunch truck.
Selling or serving food for take out or delivery.Delivering food ordered from a food service establishment.
Catering a public event, a private party or a private function.Personal chef who is hired to prepare and serve food in a private home and does no pre-preparation, brings in no equipment and leaves any leftover food.
Selling or serving barbeque or other food in a food truck that meets MFDV requirements.Roadside vegetable stand or boiled peanut vendor.
Selling or serving food on a dinner cruise, river cruise, “cruise to nowhere,” or gambling excursion ship.Selling or serving food on a common carrier such as cruise ship, train, or airplane.
Selling or serving food at a temporary event such as a fair, carnival, sporting event, or farmer’s market.Selling or serving food at a temporary event such as a fair, carnival, sporting event, or farmer’s market if:

  • offering only ice, popcorn or packaged food/drink without additional preparation;
  • the event is located on church or school property; or
  • the vendor is a civic, fraternal or religious non-profit organization; or
  • the event host is a civic, fraternal or religious non-profit organization; or
  • the event is a food contest or cook-off.
Vending machine stocked with foods such as sandwiches, ice cream, and milkVending machine stocked with only foods such as chips, candy bars, or canned drinks. Vending machine located in a facility regulated under 381.0072, F.S., regardless of the type of food or drinks stocked.
Theater serving food such as pizza, hamburgers, or French fries.Theater serving traditional theater food such as hot dogs, nachos, pretzels, packaged candy, popcorn or drinks.

Talent Agencies

A Talent Agency is a person or business who, for compensation, engages in the occupation or business of procuring or attempting to procure employment for an artist.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc.  An Artist is any person performing on the professional stage or in the production of television, radio, or motion pictures; a musician or group of musicians; or a model. A person may not own, operate, solicit business, or otherwise engage in or carry on the occupation of a talent agency until a license is obtained from the department. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license.  Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Procure entertainment employment for artists, musical groups, or models for compensation.Procure entertainment engagements for oneself, a family member, or exclusively for one artist regardless of payment received.

Veterinary Medicine

Veterinary Medicine means diagnosing the medical condition of animals and prescribing, dispensing or administering drugs, medicine, or treatment of whatever nature for the prevention, cure or relief of a wound, fracture, bodily injury, or disease thereof; performing any manual procedure for the diagnosis of or treatment for pregnancy or fertility or infertility of animals; or representing oneself by the use of a title, or undertaking, offering, or hold oneself out, as performing any of these functions.  The term also includes the determination of the health, fitness, or soundness of an animal. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license. Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
Treatment or diagnosis of an animal.Treating the ills or injuries of animals you own.
Immunization or treatment of diseases of animals that are communicable (can be transferred) to humans.Grooming or boarding unless performed at a veterinary clinic.
Microchipping.Farriery and manual hand floating of teeth on equines (horses) if hired by an owner.  Examples of farriering include equine hoof care, the trimming and balancing of a horse’s hoof and the placing of shoes to the horse’s foot.

Yacht and Ship Brokers and Salespersons

A yacht and ship broker is someone who performs the services of buying and/or selling a previously owned yacht on behalf of another person, for compensation.  The term “yacht” is defined as any vessel in the water which is propelled by sail or machinery and exceeds 32 feet in length and weighs less than 300 gross tons. A yacht and ship salesperson is someone who is employed by a yacht broker to perform the services of a broker.  If you are going to hire someone to perform the services of a yacht broker or salesperson in Florida, they need to be licensed.  Yacht brokers and salespersons are also required to carry a good and sufficient surety bond or letter of credit. The Yacht and Ship Brokers’ Act establishes jurisdiction to regulate the activities of brokers and salespersons of yachts in Florida. These persons are licensed and regulated by the Yacht and Ship Brokers’ Section, a sub-unit of the Division of Florida Condominiums, Timeshares, and Mobile Homes. The section is located in Tallahassee and performs licensing, educational, and investigative functions with consumer protection as the primary focus of the regulation. The section processes licenses and responds to consumer complaints and inquiries concerning activities within the industry. The following items are offered as examples of services that require an individual with a Florida license to perform, and services that do not require an individual with a Florida license to perform.  The list is not all inclusive. If you have specific questions, please contact the Yacht and Ship Brokers’ Section at 850.487.2987 or by email at  yacht&shipbrokers.ctmh@dbpr.state.fl.us. You can also visit the Section’s website in order to access Chapter 326, F.S., Administrative Rules, Division forms, and FAQ at   http://www.myfloridalicense.com/yacht-and-ships/faqs/

 Needs a DBPR License Does not need a DBPR License
To buy, sell, offer, or negotiate to buy or sell a previously owned yacht for other persons in expectation of compensation.To sell your own yacht.
To solicit or obtain listings of a previously owned yacht in expectation of compensation.A transaction involving the sale of a new yacht.
To negotiate the purchase, sale, or exchange of a previously owned yacht for other persons in expectation of compensation.A transaction involving the foreclosure of a security interest in a yacht.

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