Tips for Hiring Licensed Professionals

Why Hire A Licensed Professional?

Why Hire A Licensed Professional?

  • A licensed professional has the required education, experience, insurance and qualifications to obtain a license. They must pass a competency examination before practicing.
  • Many licensed individuals are screened for prior criminal history.
  • The department can discipline and even revoke a license if the person does not live up to professional standards. This is a not a total safeguard, but is a strong incentive for the licensee to do good work.
  • You may be able to sue the licensee in civil court for problems related to the work done.

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Asbestos Consultants & Removal

Asbestos Consultants & Removal

  • Get bids from a minimum of three different qualified and licensed contractors.
  • Clearly define the parameters of the project and your expectations to each bidding contractor so that they know how to bid. Beware of any bid that is substantially lower than the other bids—this may be an indication that the contractor takes short cuts at the expense of safety.
  • Ask each contractor for references that you can contact to learn about the quality of the contractors’ previous work.
  • Request a work plan that details procedures and project schedules. This helps determine whether the contractor you are considering fully understands and can handle the project. Obtain a written commitment for full-time, on-site project supervision and make sure the project supervisor’s training certification document is included in bid documents.
  • Select a contractor who has a comprehensive employee training program.
  • Make sure the contractor you are considering has a valid, current contractor’s license and certificate for asbestos abatement work.
  • Make sure the contractor has current registration (or an approved exemption) as an asbestos abatement contractor.

Athlete Agents

Athlete Agents

  • What Athlete Agent services require license with the Department?

An Athlete Agent is a person who, directly or indirectly, recruits or solicits a student athlete* to enter into an agent contract for compensation.  Examples of compensation are cash, goods, services, etc.  It also includes anyone who procures, offers, promises, or attempts to obtain employment or promotional fees or benefits for a student athlete with a professional sports team or as a professional athlete, or with any promoter who markets or attempts to market the student athlete’s athletic ability or athletic reputation. *A “Student Athlete” means any student who: Has informed, in writing, a college or university in Florida of the student’s intent to participate in that school’s intercollegiate athletics, or who does participate in that school’s intercollegiate athletics and is eligible to do so. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the department at 850.487.1395 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com.  You should also check with your county or city to learn whether or not a local business tax receipt or certificate of competency is required for services that do not require a state license. Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

Needs a LicenseDoes not need a License
Enter into a contract with a student athlete for compensation.Acting on behalf of a student athlete if you are a spouse, parent, sibling, grandparent or guardian of a student athlete, or an individual acting solely on behalf of a professional sports team or organization (e.g. coaches, owners, scouts).
Promote or market a student athlete or his athletic reputation or attempts to obtain employment or promotional fees or benefits for a student athlete for any type of compensation.Contact or represent a student whose college eligibility has expired, regardless of compensation.

Auctioneers

Auctioneers

  • Planning an estate auction? Find a licensed Auctioneer.
  • Find out the auctioneer’s specialty. Many auctioneers specialize in only a few types of auctions.
  • They will know the market best. They can determine the value of the items you want to sell, and they will know how to attract the buyers most interested in your property.
  • Verify the person and the business is licensed with the DBPR.
  • The auctioneer’s license number begins with “AU,” followed by a set of numbers. The auction business license number begins with “AB,” followed by a set of numbers.
  • Auctioneers must display their licenses at the auction site, and include the numbers in all advertising such as yellow page advertisements and newspapers.
  • Ask for a resume and references. Reputable auctioneers will be happy to provide information on their background and experience, along with the names and phone numbers of satisfied customers for you to contact.
  • Talk with your friends, neighbors, and relatives about their experiences with auctioneers.
  • Interview several auctioneers before you decide.
  • Make a checklist. Before the auction, you should get an inventory of your goods, and a copy of the written contract.
  • After the auction, the auctioneer should pay you for any items sold within 30 days of the sale.
  • The auctioneer should also account for, pay, or return any unsold property to you within 30 days after the sale.
  • Download our Auctioneers Brochure for more tips.

Barbers and Barbershops

Auctioneers

  • All barbers must have their license posted at their workstation with photo attached.
  • Look for shop license and the license of the person providing the service.
  • Observe the overall condition of the shop: Floors, walls, ceilings, furniture, fixtures and other apparatus, and all other exposed surfaces in every barber shop and school should be clean and sanitary, free from dust and in good repair at all times.
  • Brooms, mops, and any other articles used to wash floors, brush or wash the walls, should not be left exposed. All residues, cut hair, dirt, etc., swept off the floor should be placed in a covered container or containers until properly disposed of outside the barbershop or school. It should appear clean and neat. Towels should be stored in closed cabinets, hair should be swept from the floor, and combs and brushes should be properly sanitized.
  • Did the barber wash his/her hands before providing his service?
  • Does the headrest of the barber chair have a clean covering of cloth or paper?
  • Are clean towels kept exclusively in a closed, clean cabinet drawer or closet?
  • Are used towels in a covered container or containers? Your barber should not leave any used towels on a workstation, barber chair, sink or otherwise exposed at any place in a barbershop or school.
  • Be sure your barber does not use a shaving brush on you for sanitary purposes.
  • Make sure your barber uses soap in liquid form only.
  • Are hair tonics, lotions and cosmetics clearly labeled with the name of the manufacturer?
  • Are the combs and brushes immersed in an EPA approved sanitizer?

Boxing

What Boxing Services require a DBPR License? The function of the Florida State Boxing Commission is to license and regulate professional boxing, kickboxing and mixed martial arts within the State of Florida.  The statutes and rules governing this profession are in Chapter 548, Florida Statutes, and Rule 61K-1, Florida Administrative Code.  The Commission has exclusive jurisdiction over every match held within the state which involves a professional.  The Commission also has exclusive jurisdiction over approval, disapproval, suspension of approval, and revocation of approval of all amateur sanctioning organizations for amateur boxing and kickboxing matches held in this state. Amateur:  A person who has never received nor competed for any purse or other article of value, either for the expenses of training or for participating in a match, other than a prize of $50 in value or less. Professional:  A person who has received or competed for any purse or other article of a value greater than $50, either for the expenses of training or for participating in any match. A participant, promoter, manager, trainer, second, time-keeper, referee, judge, announcer, physician and match-maker all require a license. These items are offered as examples of services you do need to hire a person with a Florida license and services you do not need to hire a person with a Florida license.  The list is not all inclusive.  If you have specific questions, please contact the Commission at 850.488.8500 or review the rules for the profession at www.myfloridalicense.com. Please visit our Unlicensed Activity page to learn more about how you can help us combat Unlicensed Activity.

Needs a License or ApprovalDoes not need a License
A participant, manager, trainer, second, time-keeper, referee, judge, announcer, physician, match-maker, directly or indirectly acting in any match involving a participant.A match conducted or sponsored by a bona fide nonprofit school or education program whose primary purpose is instruction in the martial arts, boxing, or kickboxing, if the match held in conjunction with the instruction is limited to amateur participants who are students of the school or instructional program.
A promoter who, directly or indirectly, promotes matches involving a professional.  No promoter may be associated with any foreign co-promoter in promoting any match unless the foreign co-promoter has been issued a license.A match conducted or sponsored by any company or detachment of the Florida National Guard, if the match is limited to participants who are members of the company or detachment of the Florida National Guard.
A foreign co-promoter who, directly or indirectly, participates in the promotion of, receives any remuneration from, or renders any services in connection with any match involving a professional.A match conducted or sponsored by the Fraternal Order of Police, if the match is limited to amateur participants and is held in conjunction with a charitable event.
Any match involving amateurs which utilizes, but is not necessarily limited to, strikes or blows to the head must be sanctioned and supervised by an amateur sanctioning organizationapproved by the commission.

Construction Trades

Choosing a Contractor

  • Before you hire a contractor, ask to see a state-issued license.
  • Be sure the license looks like the example below. Ask to see multiple forms of identification.
  • An occupational license does not qualify an individual to act as a contractor, it’s really just a “tax revenue receipt.”
  • Being registered with the Division of Corporations as in INC. or LLC. does not qualify an individual or company to act as a contractor.
  • The individual must be licensed by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation.
  • Ask for references. A legitimate contractor will be happy to provide you with the names and contact information of recent customers.
  • Get a written estimate from several licensed contractors. Make sure the estimate includes the work the contractor will do, the materials involved, the completion date, and total cost.
  • Beware of contractors who claim to be the fastest or the cheapest. Hiring them could result in poor workmanship, inferior materials or unfinished jobs.
  • Contact your insurance agent first to verify your insurance covers the repairs before you sign a contract. Know the steps to file a claim. You do not have to tell the contractor how much your insurance company will pay for repairs, but if you do, get the contractor’s estimate first.
  • A contractor must have a license from DBPR to perform roofing repairs or replacements, structural additions, air conditioning repair or replacement, plumbing work, electrical and/or alarm work. These jobs typically require a permit. Be sure to check with your local building department regarding permit requirements for all of your projects.
  • DBPR does not license or have jurisdiction over concrete contractors, painters, drywall contractors, cabinetmakers, tile installers, or anyone doing minor repairs. Check with your local building department regarding licensure requirements for these trades. Remember to ask for references.

Contractor License Example

Cosmetologists and Salons

  • Looking to get your hair done? Be an informed consumer. Check out the salon first.

Make sure:

  • The establishment license is posted prominently in the reception area.
  • Each operator’s license is posted in plain view at his or her work station.
  • The Board’s Health and Safety poster is displayed in the reception area.
  • There is adequate ventilation for release of fumes created by artificial nail products, nail polish, or other chemicals.
  • Use your senses.
  • The salon must have clean working equipment and a clean work area.
  • Licensees must wash and disinfect all tools and instruments before they can be used on customers.
  • Make sure the operator never uses the same tools on you that were just used on someone else without first disinfecting them. If an item cannot be disinfected, such as a nail buffer block or an emery board, it must be thrown away immediately after use.
  • Don’t allow an operator to perform a service on you if they don’t use a clean set of tools. The improper disinfecting of tools and equipment can spread disease and bacteria from one person to another. A prime example would be the spread of nail fungus during a manicure or pedicure.
  • You have every right to ask the operator to explain the disinfections procedures before a service begins. Various viruses can be transmitted through the use of dirty instruments, including HIV and Hepatitis B.
  • In addition to disinfecting tools and instruments, operators are required to wash their hands before their next client. Before an operator begins nail care services, they should also ask their clients to wash their hands.
  • Don’t risk your health. If the disinfections procedure doesn’t sound adequate, you should refuse the service.
  • Licensed salons are inspected by the department to make sure they maintain sanitation standards for the safety of the public. Salons operating without a license under the radar of inspectors may have no standards in place for your safety.
  • Licensed cosmetologists receive continuing education so they can stay informed on the most recent information in the profession, including sanitation procedures. If the unlicensed person does not know enough or car enough to obtain a license, do you really want that person using their instruments on your hair or skin?

Electrical Contractors

  • Ask all potential contractors to see their state-issued licenses. Make sure a contractor’s license is current and active.
  • Be sure the license looks like the example above. Ask to see multiple forms of identification.
  • An occupational license does NOT qualify an individual to act as a contractor.
  • Ask for references. A legitimate contractor will be happy to provide you with the names and contact information of recent customers.
  • Get a written estimate from several licensed contractors. Make sure the estimate includes the work the contractor will do, the materials involved, the completion date and the total cost.
  • Read your contract carefully and personally fill in any blank spaces. Consider having an attorney review the contract. If you do not have an attorney, the Florida Bar offers an attorney referral service.
  • Don’t sign off that the work is completed until all work is finished according to your contract and the contractor has cleared all permits with final inspection approval from the building department.

Employee Leasing Companies

  • An Employee Leasing company is not the same as a temporary agency.
  • Be suspicious of any employment-service firm that promises to get you a job.
  • Even if employment service firm guarantees refunds to dissatisfied customers, check on their reliability with outside sources like the BBB or local consumer protection offices.
  • Do not give out your credit card or bank account information over the phone unless you are familiar with the company and agree to pay for something. Anyone who has your account information can use it to take money from your accounts improperly.
  • Get a copy of the firm’s contract and review it carefully before you pay any money. Understand the terms and conditions of the firm’s refund policy. If oral promises are made that do not also appear in the contract, think twice about doing business with the firm.
  • Follow-up with the corporate offices of any company listed in an ad by an employment service, to find out if that company is really hiring.
  • Be wary of firms promoting “previously undisclosed” federal government jobs. All federal positions are announced to the public.
  • Check with the BBB and DBPR to see if any complaints have been filed about a company with which you intend to do business.

Geologists

  • No one may represent themselves to the public as a certified geologist unless licensed as a Geologist.
  • Check for past disciplinary action against the individual.
  • Check the individual’s references.
  • Inquire about professional memberships, which would indicate the individual is active within the geology profession.
  • Verify the license.

Landscape Architects

  • Get referrals from friends and neighbors who have landscaping you admire, or from the landscape architect who developed your plans.
  • Ask for the contractor’s state license number and verify that it is issued for landscaping, is current, and is in good standing.
  • Request a list of similar jobs the landscape architect has recently completed in your area. Look at the work and talk to the owners, if possible.
  • Ask if the landscape architect has liability and workers’ compensation insurance. Request certificates in writing.

Veterinary Medicine

  • Verify the veterinarian you are considering is licensed and that his or her license is in good standing.
  • All veterinarians who practice in the United States must be graduates of an accredited school of veterinary medicine and must have a current license on display.
  • All Veterinary Establishments must be licensed with a premise permit from the DBPR. The license should be displayed for public viewing.
  • Tour the facility. It is important that the facility is clean and tidy.
  • Those Vet in the Park or at the local pet store events are Limited Services Clinics which are required to be registered with the department.
  • A licensed veterinarian must remain on site throughout the duration of the limited service clinic.
  • Only a licensed veterinarian may administer rabies vaccinations.
  • Pet micro chipping is NOT allowed at these limited service clinics.
  • Limited service clinics cannot be held more than once every two weeks and no more than four hours in any one day for a single location.